Detail publikace

Guest Editorial: Low Voltage Integrated Circuits and Systems

Originální název

Guest Editorial: Low Voltage Integrated Circuits and Systems

Anglický název

Guest Editorial: Low Voltage Integrated Circuits and Systems

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Interest in developing new design techniques for low-voltage integrated circuits and systems has continued over several decades. It is mainly caused by system power constraints and advanced deep submicron technologies, which require lower and lower supply voltages. Since the early 90's, when the supply voltage of 3.3 V was considered as low, the required supply voltages have been constantly decreasing, in some applications dropping (much) below 1 V. Nowadays, as predicted by the Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, we can expect that the supply voltages will be reduced to 0.6 V for high performance microprocessors and 0.54 V for low power solutions in a near future. Regarding the latter, in some cases even lower VDD can be required, e.g., for circuits supplied with non-conventional energy sources, and devoted to some specific applications, like biomedical implants. The increasing demand for both the low supply voltage and the energy efficiency often have a detrimental effect, especially upon analog and mixed signal circuits, which must operate with reduced voltage headroom and power dissipation. Therefore, the most challenging task for today's designers is to maintain the circuit performances by developing novel circuit structures capable of operating with highly reduced supply voltages.

Anglický abstrakt

Interest in developing new design techniques for low-voltage integrated circuits and systems has continued over several decades. It is mainly caused by system power constraints and advanced deep submicron technologies, which require lower and lower supply voltages. Since the early 90's, when the supply voltage of 3.3 V was considered as low, the required supply voltages have been constantly decreasing, in some applications dropping (much) below 1 V. Nowadays, as predicted by the Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, we can expect that the supply voltages will be reduced to 0.6 V for high performance microprocessors and 0.54 V for low power solutions in a near future. Regarding the latter, in some cases even lower VDD can be required, e.g., for circuits supplied with non-conventional energy sources, and devoted to some specific applications, like biomedical implants. The increasing demand for both the low supply voltage and the energy efficiency often have a detrimental effect, especially upon analog and mixed signal circuits, which must operate with reduced voltage headroom and power dissipation. Therefore, the most challenging task for today's designers is to maintain the circuit performances by developing novel circuit structures capable of operating with highly reduced supply voltages.

BibTex


@misc{BUT139073,
  author="Fabian {Khateb} and Spyridon {Vlassis} and Tomasz {Kulej}",
  title="Guest Editorial: Low Voltage Integrated Circuits and Systems",
  annote="Interest in developing new design techniques for low-voltage integrated circuits and systems has continued over several decades. It is mainly caused by system power constraints and advanced deep submicron technologies, which require lower and lower supply voltages. Since the early 90's, when the supply voltage of 3.3 V was considered as low, the required supply voltages have been constantly decreasing, in some applications dropping (much) below 1 V. Nowadays, as predicted by the Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, we can expect that the supply voltages will be reduced to 0.6 V for high performance microprocessors and 0.54 V for low power solutions in a near future. Regarding the latter, in some cases even lower VDD can be required, e.g., for circuits supplied with non-conventional energy sources, and devoted to some specific applications, like biomedical implants. 
The increasing demand for both the low supply voltage and the energy efficiency often have a detrimental effect, especially upon analog and mixed signal circuits, which must operate with reduced voltage headroom and power dissipation. Therefore, the most challenging task for today's designers is to maintain the circuit performances by developing novel circuit structures capable of operating with highly reduced supply voltages.",
  address="SPRINGER BIRKHAUSER",
  chapter="139073",
  doi="10.1007/s00034-017-0666-7",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="SPRINGER BIRKHAUSER",
  number="12,  IF: 1.694",
  year="2017",
  month="september",
  pages="4769--4773",
  publisher="SPRINGER BIRKHAUSER",
  type="editorial"
}