Detail publikace

Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

FOJTLÍN, M. POKORNÝ, J. FIŠER, J. TOMA, R. TUHOVČÁK, J.

Originální název

Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

Anglický název

Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning) systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

Anglický abstrakt

Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning) systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

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Dokumenty

BibTex


@article{BUT131729,
  author="Miloš {Fojtlín} and Jan {Pokorný} and Jan {Fišer} and Róbert {Toma} and Ján {Tuhovčák}",
  title="Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort",
  annote="Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning) systems have become an essential part
of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in
Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit
cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For
this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market.
However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays.
The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use
electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected,
that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost
impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an
approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a
method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed.
Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.",
  address="EDP Sciences",
  booktitle="EFM16 – Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2016",
  chapter="131729",
  doi="10.1051/epjconf/201714302026",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="EDP Sciences",
  number="1",
  volume="143",
  year="2017",
  month="may",
  pages="1--4",
  publisher="EDP Sciences",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}