Course detail

International Human Resource and Information Management

FP-EihrimPAcad. year: 2019/2020

a) Introduction to international dimensions of Human Resource Management and Management/Organisational Behaviour: aimed at providing the necessary background in management theory and practice.
b) Core theories, concepts and concerns relating to recruitment, selection, training, motivation, leadership and staffing strategies at international level.
c) Exploring data, information and knowledge: an examination of the ways in which information is used and distorted in organisations and the impact of ICT-enabled applications on management.
d) Information and knowledge: potential value and competitive advantage. Introducing and exploring key applications and their role within the international organisation. This will include key features, relationships and implications for data, information, knowledge and for people and their relationship to IS and culture.
e) Development of people and their relationship IS and culture as a mechanism for discussing both success and failure within the organisational environment. Highlighting changing roles and skills requirements which provide wider implications.

Learning outcomes of the course unit

a) Critically assess and demonstrate a clear understanding of the main theories/models in international HRM
b) Augment critical understanding of relevant theories and debates in the use of information systems to support modern organisations
c) Highlight an international awareness and openness to the world in terms of work organisation and information systems support, based on appreciation of social and cultural diversity
d) Demonstrate a critical understanding and appreciation of global business context and its association for managing people, information and knowledge
e) Demonstrate independent study and research skills through the critical application of models, theories and concepts in class discussion, written work and the analysis of case studies.
f) Work collaboratively in internationally diverse teams

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the course is conditional on the knowledge of management and information systems.

Co-requisites

Not applicable.

Recommended optional programme components

Not applicable.

Recommended or required reading

BEYNON-DAVIES, P. (2009) Business Information Systems, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan
BREWSTER, C., SPARROW, P. and VERNONET, G. (2011) International Human Resource Management, 3rd Ed. London: CIPD.
DOWLING, P. and WELCH, D. (2008) International Human Resource Management: Managing People in a Multinational Context, London: Thomson.
HISLOP, D. (2009) Knowledge Management in Organizations, Oxford: Oxford University Press
HARZING, A.W. and PINNINGTON, A.H. (2011) International Human Resource Management. London: Sage.
LAUDON, K.C. and LAUDON, J.P. (2014) Management Information Systems: managing the digital firm, 13th Ed. Boston: Pearson.

Planned learning activities and teaching methods

Interactive lectures, discussions and seminars, which include exercises, case studies, videos and plenary discussions.

Assesment methods and criteria linked to learning outcomes


50% Case study based group role-play competition with two consultancy teams of mixed nationalities meet ‘head to head’ in a business meeting with senior management (assessors) to discuss diagnosis and prognosis of international HRM issues in the case organisation. After the assessment, students should submit 1000 words case analysis in an essay style, detailing the case analysis supported with relevant literature and exemplars. To comply with the NBS’ Group Work Policy, students should also submit 1) group work evidence; 2) peer assessment form; 3) 500words, individual reflection of group work.
The assessment will be marked using grade based assessment sheet with written comments against both individually assessed group-work criteria and the criteria for the role-play competition.
Learning outcomes assessed: a); d); f)

50% 2000 words, essay style
Information / Knowledge focus in relation to organisational issues
Learning outcomes assessed: b); c); e)

Language of instruction

English

Work placements

Not applicable.

Course curriculum

The module starts by introducing the study of HRM from the global perspective and examining the historical and societal contexts to development of early management theory. The module examines the changing global working environment and the issues which managers need to understand, such as social, cultural, political, legal, technological, power and the ‘informal organisation’. Inevitably, the way in which work is organised and managed has consequences for the management of people and this is initially explored from the organisational, group and individual perspective.
In the second stage of the module attention is redirected towards the role of technology in the constant reshaping of the organisational environment, the tasks that people complete and how those tasks are enacted across changing roles. Further, the role of information and knowledge in shaping activities at the organisational, group and individual level are examined in the context of what it is to ‘manage’ and how these are constituted in terms of organisational and individual knowledge.
We also consider what can we learn from recent developments across HRM, organisational behaviour and information management theory and employ concepts from both to better understand the range of determinants which affect managerial effectiveness. In doing so we will consider the skills and knowledge managers need in order to chart a course through organisational life and the role that information and knowledge play in the processes of managing and leading a global workforce in the twenty first century.
The aim of the module is to develop in programme members a critical awareness of current and emerging issues in the managing of organisations, with particular focus on the relationship between people, information and knowledge and how these contribute towards global citizenship and the international manager focus. Achieving this aim will enhance the contribution of these key assets in sustaining long-term personal and managerial success.
Topics lectures are as follows:
1. Introduction to international dimensions of Human Resource Management and Management/Organisational Behaviour: aimed at providing the necessary background in management theory and practice.
2. Core theories, concepts and concerns relating to recruitment, selection, training, motivation, leadership and staffing strategies at international level.
3. Exploring data, information and knowledge: an examination of the ways in which information is used and distorted in organisations and the impact of ICT-enabled applications on management.
4. Information and knowledge: potential value and competitive advantage. Introducing and exploring key applications and their role within the international organisation. This will include key features, relationships and implications for data, information, knowledge. and for people and their relationship to IS and culture.
5. Development of people and their relationship IS and culture as a mechanism for discussing both success and failure within the organisational environment. Highlighting changing roles and skills requirements which provide wider implications.

Aims

This module provides management students the opportunity to study two core sub disciplines, Human Resource Management (HRM) and Information Systems (IS) as a coherent whole. The focus of this ‘coherent whole’ will emphasise both the uniqueness of both disciplines but also their interrelatedness in terms of their contribution to the development and changing needs of organisational practises. These disciplines are often taught as independent ‘silos’ under the management rubric but in fact share a common concern reflected in changing organisational needs, practises, structures, and cultures, as well as changing roles reflected by and through technological deployment, sustainability and information use.

Specification of controlled education, way of implementation and compensation for absences

Attendance at lectures is not compulsory, but is recommended. Attendance at seminars is checked by the tutor. Lessons are composed on the basis of weekly schedules. Way of substituting missed lessons is fully in competence of a teacher.

Classification of course in study plans

  • Programme MGR-EBF Master's, 2. year of study, winter semester, 8 credits, compulsory

Type of course unit

 

Lecture

52 hours, optionally

Teacher / Lecturer

Exercise

26 hours, compulsory

Teacher / Lecturer

eLearning