Publication detail

Vortex topographic microscopy for full-field reference-free imaging and testing

BOUCHAL, P. ŠTRBKOVÁ, L. DOSTÁL, Z. BOUCHAL, Z.

Original Title

Vortex topographic microscopy for full-field reference-free imaging and testing

English Title

Vortex topographic microscopy for full-field reference-free imaging and testing

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

Light vortices carry orbital angular momentum and have a variety of applications in optical manipulation, high-capacity communications or microscopy. Here we propose a new concept of full-field vortex topographic microscopy enabling a reference-free displacement and shape measurement of reflective samples. The sample surface is mapped by an array of light spots enabling quantitative reconstruction of the local depths from defocused wavefronts. Light from the spots is converted to a lattice of mutually uncorrelated double-helix point spread functions (PSFs) whose angular rotation enables depth estimation. The PSFs are created by self-interference of optical vortices that originate from the same wavefront and are shaped by a spiral phase mask (SPM). The method benefits from the isoplanatic PSFs whose shape and size remain unchanged under defocusing, ensuring high precision in a wide range of measured depths. The technique was tested using a microscope Nikon Eclipse E600 working with a micro-hole plate providing structured illumination and the SPM placed in the imaging path. The depth measurement was demonstrated in the range of 11 μm exceeding the depth of field of the microscope objective up to 25 times. Throughout this range, the surface depth was mapped with the precision better than 30 nm at the lateral positions given with the precision better than 10 nm. Application potential of the method was demonstrated by profiling the top surface of a bearing ball and reconstructing the three-dimensional relief of a reflection phase grating.

English abstract

Light vortices carry orbital angular momentum and have a variety of applications in optical manipulation, high-capacity communications or microscopy. Here we propose a new concept of full-field vortex topographic microscopy enabling a reference-free displacement and shape measurement of reflective samples. The sample surface is mapped by an array of light spots enabling quantitative reconstruction of the local depths from defocused wavefronts. Light from the spots is converted to a lattice of mutually uncorrelated double-helix point spread functions (PSFs) whose angular rotation enables depth estimation. The PSFs are created by self-interference of optical vortices that originate from the same wavefront and are shaped by a spiral phase mask (SPM). The method benefits from the isoplanatic PSFs whose shape and size remain unchanged under defocusing, ensuring high precision in a wide range of measured depths. The technique was tested using a microscope Nikon Eclipse E600 working with a micro-hole plate providing structured illumination and the SPM placed in the imaging path. The depth measurement was demonstrated in the range of 11 μm exceeding the depth of field of the microscope objective up to 25 times. Throughout this range, the surface depth was mapped with the precision better than 30 nm at the lateral positions given with the precision better than 10 nm. Application potential of the method was demonstrated by profiling the top surface of a bearing ball and reconstructing the three-dimensional relief of a reflection phase grating.

Keywords

Three-dimensional microscopy; Spatial filtering; Optical vortices; Talbot and self-imaging effects

Released

24.08.2017

Publisher

The Optical Society (OSA)

Location

MASSACHUSETTS AVE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA

Pages from

21428

Pages to

21443

Pages count

16

URL

BibTex


@article{BUT138403,
  author="Petr {Bouchal} and Lenka {Štrbková} and Zbyněk {Dostál} and Zdeněk {Bouchal}",
  title="Vortex topographic microscopy for full-field reference-free imaging and testing",
  annote="Light vortices carry orbital angular momentum and have a variety of applications in optical manipulation, high-capacity communications or microscopy. Here we propose a new concept of full-field vortex topographic microscopy enabling a reference-free displacement and shape measurement of reflective samples. The sample surface is mapped by an array of light spots enabling quantitative reconstruction of the local depths from defocused wavefronts. Light from the spots is converted to a lattice of mutually uncorrelated double-helix point spread functions (PSFs) whose angular rotation enables depth estimation. The PSFs are created by self-interference of optical vortices that originate from the same wavefront and are shaped by a spiral phase mask (SPM). The method benefits from the isoplanatic PSFs whose shape and size remain unchanged under defocusing, ensuring high precision in a wide range of measured depths. The technique was tested using a microscope Nikon Eclipse E600 working with a micro-hole plate providing structured illumination and the SPM placed in the imaging path. The depth measurement was demonstrated in the range of 11 μm exceeding the depth of field of the microscope objective up to 25 times. Throughout this range, the surface depth was mapped with the precision better than 30 nm at the lateral positions given with the precision better than 10 nm. Application potential of the method was demonstrated by profiling the top surface of a bearing ball and reconstructing the three-dimensional relief of a reflection phase grating.",
  address="The Optical Society (OSA)",
  chapter="138403",
  doi="10.1364/OE.25.021428",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="The Optical Society (OSA)",
  number="18",
  volume="25",
  year="2017",
  month="august",
  pages="21428--21443",
  publisher="The Optical Society (OSA)",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}