Publication detail

Non-negative intensity and back-calculated non-negative intensity for analysis of directional structure-borne sound

LIU, D. HAVRÁNEK, Z. MARBURG, S. PETERS, H. KESSISSOGLOU, N.

Original Title

Non-negative intensity and back-calculated non-negative intensity for analysis of directional structure-borne sound

English Title

Non-negative intensity and back-calculated non-negative intensity for analysis of directional structure-borne sound

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

Non-negative intensity (NNI) is an approach to identify the surface areas of a structure that contribute to sound power. NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained directly at the structural surface and as such can only identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that fully circumscribes the structure. In contrast, back-calculated NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained at a far-field receiver surface, and hence can identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that does not fully circumscribe the structure. In this work, NNI and acoustic intensity obtained numerically using the boundary element method and experimentally from near-field acoustic holography measurements are compared for different modes. Back-calculated NNI evaluated for full and partial receiver surfaces is also compared with acoustic intensity for the different modes. Results for back-calculated NNI show that different regions on the plate surface contribute sound to different receiver locations.

English abstract

Non-negative intensity (NNI) is an approach to identify the surface areas of a structure that contribute to sound power. NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained directly at the structural surface and as such can only identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that fully circumscribes the structure. In contrast, back-calculated NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained at a far-field receiver surface, and hence can identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that does not fully circumscribe the structure. In this work, NNI and acoustic intensity obtained numerically using the boundary element method and experimentally from near-field acoustic holography measurements are compared for different modes. Back-calculated NNI evaluated for full and partial receiver surfaces is also compared with acoustic intensity for the different modes. Results for back-calculated NNI show that different regions on the plate surface contribute sound to different receiver locations.

Keywords

non-negative intensity, near-field acoustic holography, boundary element method

Released

11.07.2017

Publisher

AIP Publishing

Location

1305 Walt Whitman Road, Melville, NY 11747-4300, USA

ISBN

0001-4966

Periodical

JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Year of study

142

Number

1

State

US

Pages from

117

Pages to

123

Pages count

7

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT137773,
  author="Daipei {Liu} and Zdeněk {Havránek} and Steffen {Marburg} and Herwig {Peters} and Nicole {Kessissoglou}",
  title="Non-negative intensity and back-calculated non-negative intensity for analysis of directional structure-borne sound",
  annote="Non-negative intensity (NNI) is an approach to identify the surface areas of a structure that contribute to sound power. NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained directly at the structural surface and as such can only identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that fully circumscribes the structure. In contrast, back-calculated NNI is evaluated in terms of the acoustic impedance matrix obtained at a far-field receiver surface, and hence can identify surface contributions to sound power at a far-field receiver surface that does not fully circumscribe the structure. In this work, NNI and acoustic intensity obtained numerically using the boundary element method and experimentally from near-field acoustic holography measurements are compared for different modes. Back-calculated NNI evaluated for full and partial receiver surfaces is also compared with acoustic intensity for the different modes. Results for back-calculated NNI show that different regions on the plate surface contribute sound to different receiver locations.",
  address="AIP Publishing",
  chapter="137773",
  doi="10.1121/1.4990374",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="AIP Publishing",
  number="1",
  volume="142",
  year="2017",
  month="july",
  pages="117--123",
  publisher="AIP Publishing",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}