Publication detail

Monitoring Progress of Parkinson’s Disease Based on Changes in Phonation: a Pilot Study

GALÁŽ, Z. MEKYSKA, J. KISKA, T. ZVONČÁK, V. MUCHA, J. HARÁR, P. SMÉKAL, Z. ELIÁŠOVÁ, I. MRAČKOVÁ, M. KOŠŤÁLOVÁ, M. REKTOROVÁ, I. ALONSO-HERNANDEZ, J. GOMEZ-VILDA, P.

Original Title

Monitoring Progress of Parkinson’s Disease Based on Changes in Phonation: a Pilot Study

English Title

Monitoring Progress of Parkinson’s Disease Based on Changes in Phonation: a Pilot Study

Type

conference paper

Language

en

Original Abstract

Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a frequent symptom of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although it is hypothesized its progress is tightly linked with changes in other motor/non-motor features of PD, it has not been proved yet. The aim of this work is to employ acoustic analysis of sustained phonation in order to identify significant correlates between phonatory measures and motor/non-motor deficits in a two-year follow-up study. For this purpose, we repeatedly quantified a sustained vowel /a/ in 51 PD patients who were also assessed by 5 common clinical scales. In addition, a multivariate regression model was trained to predict the motor/non-motor deficits in the horizon of two years. Results suggest that mainly instability in vocal folds oscillation increases with the progress of PD and with overall cognitive decline. Based on the acoustic analysis, the change in clinical scores could be predicted with the error in the range of 11.83–19.60 %.

English abstract

Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a frequent symptom of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although it is hypothesized its progress is tightly linked with changes in other motor/non-motor features of PD, it has not been proved yet. The aim of this work is to employ acoustic analysis of sustained phonation in order to identify significant correlates between phonatory measures and motor/non-motor deficits in a two-year follow-up study. For this purpose, we repeatedly quantified a sustained vowel /a/ in 51 PD patients who were also assessed by 5 common clinical scales. In addition, a multivariate regression model was trained to predict the motor/non-motor deficits in the horizon of two years. Results suggest that mainly instability in vocal folds oscillation increases with the progress of PD and with overall cognitive decline. Based on the acoustic analysis, the change in clinical scores could be predicted with the error in the range of 11.83–19.60 %.

Keywords

acoustic analysis; follow-up study; hypokinetic dysarthria; Parkinson’s disease; phonation

Released

04.06.2018

Location

Atény, Řecko

ISBN

978-1-5386-4695-3

Book

41st International Conference on Telecommunications and Signal Processing (TSP)

Pages from

218

Pages to

221

Pages count

4

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT148853,
  author="Zoltán {Galáž} and Jiří {Mekyska} and Tomáš {Kiska} and Vojtěch {Zvončák} and Ján {Mucha} and Pavol {Harár} and Zdeněk {Smékal} and Ilona {Eliášová} and Martina {Mračková} and Milena {Košťálová} and Irena {Rektorová} and Jesus {Alonso-Hernandez} and Pedro {Gomez-Vilda}",
  title="Monitoring Progress of Parkinson’s Disease Based
on Changes in Phonation: a Pilot Study",
  annote="Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a frequent symptom of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although it is hypothesized its progress is tightly linked with changes in other motor/non-motor features of PD, it has not been proved yet. The aim of this work is to employ acoustic analysis of sustained phonation in order to identify significant correlates between phonatory measures and motor/non-motor deficits in a two-year follow-up study. For this purpose, we repeatedly quantified a sustained vowel /a/ in 51 PD patients who were also assessed by 5 common clinical scales. In addition, a multivariate regression model was trained to predict the motor/non-motor deficits in the horizon of two years. Results suggest that mainly instability in vocal folds oscillation increases with the progress of PD and with overall cognitive decline. Based on the acoustic analysis, the change in clinical scores could be predicted with the error in the range of 11.83–19.60 %.",
  booktitle="41st International Conference on Telecommunications and Signal Processing (TSP)",
  chapter="148853",
  howpublished="online",
  year="2018",
  month="june",
  pages="218--221",
  type="conference paper"
}