Publication detail

Heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zones in a continuous casting with the effect of steel chemistry

HORSKÝ, J. RAUDENSKÝ, M. MORAVEC, R, BLAZEK, K,

Original Title

Heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zones in a continuous casting with the effect of steel chemistry

English Title

Heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zones in a continuous casting with the effect of steel chemistry

Type

conference paper

Language

en

Original Abstract

ArcelorMittal has developed on-line cooling models to predict the surface temperature distribution of slabs during casting. The model uses heat transfer coefficients experimentally determined by The Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Laboratory of Brno Technical University (HeatLab Brno). The HeatLab’s standard practice is to determine these coefficients as a function of position under the nozzle, spray water volume, and surface temperature using austenitic stainless steel plates as the substrate. The measured HTCs accurately predicted the surface temperature for a wide range of carbon steels from about 0.04% to 1.0% carbon. While casting 3 % silicon steels on a CSP caster it was noted that the predicted surface temperature was significantly higher than the actual measured surface temperature. This anomaly led to the concern that some of the other grades being cast would also have greatly different HTCs than calculated when using a stainless steel substrate. To determine the effect of steel composition on the experimentally determined HTCs at the HeatLab a series of experiments was conducted. The HeatLab used 9 different steel compositions using the same air mist nozzle and compared the HTCs obtained for the same nozzle operating parameters. The 9 steel grades selected were ultra-low carbon, 0.04% carbon, 1020, 1050, 1523B, 1080, a high aluminum (~1.5% Al) TRIP Steel, 2% silicon steel, and stainless steel. The carbon composition ranges from 0.04 to 0.8 percent and the 1523B has about 20 ppm of boron. All grades investigated had essentially the same HTCs as determined using the standard austenitic stainless steel substrate except for the 2% silicon steel which had HTCs about 100% higher than all other steel grades investigated measured in the slab temperature range greater than 900 oC. Therefore it has been concluded based on this investigation that the HeatLab Brno HTCs derived using their standard austenitic stainless steel substrate can be used for all grades tested except 2% silicon steel.

English abstract

ArcelorMittal has developed on-line cooling models to predict the surface temperature distribution of slabs during casting. The model uses heat transfer coefficients experimentally determined by The Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Laboratory of Brno Technical University (HeatLab Brno). The HeatLab’s standard practice is to determine these coefficients as a function of position under the nozzle, spray water volume, and surface temperature using austenitic stainless steel plates as the substrate. The measured HTCs accurately predicted the surface temperature for a wide range of carbon steels from about 0.04% to 1.0% carbon. While casting 3 % silicon steels on a CSP caster it was noted that the predicted surface temperature was significantly higher than the actual measured surface temperature. This anomaly led to the concern that some of the other grades being cast would also have greatly different HTCs than calculated when using a stainless steel substrate. To determine the effect of steel composition on the experimentally determined HTCs at the HeatLab a series of experiments was conducted. The HeatLab used 9 different steel compositions using the same air mist nozzle and compared the HTCs obtained for the same nozzle operating parameters. The 9 steel grades selected were ultra-low carbon, 0.04% carbon, 1020, 1050, 1523B, 1080, a high aluminum (~1.5% Al) TRIP Steel, 2% silicon steel, and stainless steel. The carbon composition ranges from 0.04 to 0.8 percent and the 1523B has about 20 ppm of boron. All grades investigated had essentially the same HTCs as determined using the standard austenitic stainless steel substrate except for the 2% silicon steel which had HTCs about 100% higher than all other steel grades investigated measured in the slab temperature range greater than 900 oC. Therefore it has been concluded based on this investigation that the HeatLab Brno HTCs derived using their standard austenitic stainless steel substrate can be used for all grades tested except 2% silicon steel.

Keywords

Heat transfer coefficient, secondary cooling, continuous casting, cooling intensity

RIV year

2015

Released

09.04.2015

Publisher

Tanger spol. s.r.o.

Location

Ostrava

ISBN

978-80-87294-56-7

Book

OCELAŘI 2015

Edition number

1

Pages from

59

Pages to

66

Pages count

8

Documents

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT114120,
  author="Jaroslav {Horský} and Miroslav {Raudenský}",
  title="Heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zones in a continuous casting with the effect of steel chemistry

",
  annote="ArcelorMittal has developed on-line cooling models to predict the surface temperature distribution of slabs
during casting. The model uses heat transfer coefficients experimentally determined by The Heat Transfer
and Fluid Flow Laboratory of Brno Technical University (HeatLab Brno). The HeatLab’s standard practice is
to determine these coefficients as a function of position under the nozzle, spray water volume, and surface
temperature using austenitic stainless steel plates as the substrate. The measured HTCs accurately
predicted the surface temperature for a wide range of carbon steels from about 0.04% to 1.0% carbon. While
casting 3 % silicon steels on a CSP caster it was noted that the predicted surface temperature was
significantly higher than the actual measured surface temperature. This anomaly led to the concern that
some of the other grades being cast would also have greatly different HTCs than calculated when using a
stainless steel substrate. To determine the effect of steel composition on the experimentally determined
HTCs at the HeatLab a series of experiments was conducted. The HeatLab used 9 different steel
compositions using the same air mist nozzle and compared the HTCs obtained for the same nozzle
operating parameters. The 9 steel grades selected were ultra-low carbon, 0.04% carbon, 1020, 1050,
1523B, 1080, a high aluminum (~1.5% Al) TRIP Steel, 2% silicon steel, and stainless steel. The carbon
composition ranges from 0.04 to 0.8 percent and the 1523B has about 20 ppm of boron. All grades
investigated had essentially the same HTCs as determined using the standard austenitic stainless steel
substrate except for the 2% silicon steel which had HTCs about 100% higher than all other steel grades
investigated measured in the slab temperature range greater than 900 oC. Therefore it has been concluded
based on this investigation that the HeatLab Brno HTCs derived using their standard austenitic stainless
steel substrate can be used for all grades tested except 2% silicon steel.",
  address="Tanger spol. s.r.o.",
  booktitle="OCELAŘI 2015",
  chapter="114120",
  howpublished="electronic, physical medium",
  institution="Tanger spol. s.r.o.",
  year="2015",
  month="april",
  pages="59--66",
  publisher="Tanger spol. s.r.o.",
  type="conference paper"
}