Publication detail

Spray Cooling Unit for Heat Treatment of Stainless Steel Sheets

HNÍZDIL, M. CHABIČOVSKÝ, M. RAUDENSKÝ, M. MAGADOUX, E. CODE, F.

Original Title

Spray Cooling Unit for Heat Treatment of Stainless Steel Sheets

English Title

Spray Cooling Unit for Heat Treatment of Stainless Steel Sheets

Type

journal article in Scopus

Language

en

Original Abstract

Stainless steel sheets are successively heated to a temperature of 1150degree of Celsia and cooled until ambient temperature during the production process. Requirements for high cooling rates of stainless steel sheets producers lead to use water as a cooling medium. The information about cooling intensity (heat transfer coefficient) of different nozzles configurations is necessary for designing cooling sections. Although many researchers deal with water spray cooling, actually a general correlation for predicting heat transfer coefficient for wide range of nozzles configurations does not exists. That is the reason why heat transfer coefficient for different nozzles configurations can be only obtained by laboratory measurements. Heat transfer coefficient is mostly influenced by water impingement density and impact velocity. However other factors e.g. water temperature and velocity of the sheet can influence the heat transfer coefficient. Optimized design of the cooling unit with high cooling intensity and low water consumption was achieved by appropriate choice of these parameters. The moving experimental sheet was cooled from a temperature of 900 degree of Celsia to a temperature of 50 degree of Celsia with various configurations of nozzles. The tests shown that heat transfer coefficient was increasing with water impingement density and impact velocity. Increasing water temperature from 20 degree of Celsia to 80 degree of Celsia caused a decrease of the heat transfer coefficient and Leidenfrost temperature. The effect of velocity is negligible when velocities are between 25 and 100 m/min. The cooling unit was designed according to laboratory measurements to fulfill the stainless steel producer's requirements. The measurements which were done in an industrial plant confirmed the accuracy of heat transfer coefficient obtained in the laboratory. The maximum difference between laboratory and plant measurements was 15%.

English abstract

Stainless steel sheets are successively heated to a temperature of 1150degree of Celsia and cooled until ambient temperature during the production process. Requirements for high cooling rates of stainless steel sheets producers lead to use water as a cooling medium. The information about cooling intensity (heat transfer coefficient) of different nozzles configurations is necessary for designing cooling sections. Although many researchers deal with water spray cooling, actually a general correlation for predicting heat transfer coefficient for wide range of nozzles configurations does not exists. That is the reason why heat transfer coefficient for different nozzles configurations can be only obtained by laboratory measurements. Heat transfer coefficient is mostly influenced by water impingement density and impact velocity. However other factors e.g. water temperature and velocity of the sheet can influence the heat transfer coefficient. Optimized design of the cooling unit with high cooling intensity and low water consumption was achieved by appropriate choice of these parameters. The moving experimental sheet was cooled from a temperature of 900 degree of Celsia to a temperature of 50 degree of Celsia with various configurations of nozzles. The tests shown that heat transfer coefficient was increasing with water impingement density and impact velocity. Increasing water temperature from 20 degree of Celsia to 80 degree of Celsia caused a decrease of the heat transfer coefficient and Leidenfrost temperature. The effect of velocity is negligible when velocities are between 25 and 100 m/min. The cooling unit was designed according to laboratory measurements to fulfill the stainless steel producer's requirements. The measurements which were done in an industrial plant confirmed the accuracy of heat transfer coefficient obtained in the laboratory. The maximum difference between laboratory and plant measurements was 15%.

Keywords

Heat treatment, heat transfer coefficient, strip cooling, cooling intensity, sheet cooling, spray, water cooling, stainless steel

RIV year

2014

Released

22.05.2014

Publisher

Trans Tech Publications

Location

Switzerland

Pages from

1720

Pages to

1724

Pages count

5

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT107633,
  author="Milan {Hnízdil} and Martin {Chabičovský} and Miroslav {Raudenský} and Eric {Magadoux} and Florent {Code}",
  title="Spray Cooling Unit for Heat Treatment of Stainless Steel Sheets",
  annote="Stainless steel sheets are successively heated to a temperature of 1150degree of Celsia and cooled until
ambient temperature during the production process. Requirements for high cooling rates of stainless
steel sheets producers lead to use water as a cooling medium. The information about cooling intensity
(heat transfer coefficient) of different nozzles configurations is necessary for designing cooling
sections. Although many researchers deal with water spray cooling, actually a general correlation for
predicting heat transfer coefficient for wide range of nozzles configurations does not exists. That is
the reason why heat transfer coefficient for different nozzles configurations can be only obtained by
laboratory measurements. Heat transfer coefficient is mostly influenced by water impingement
density and impact velocity. However other factors e.g. water temperature and velocity of the sheet
can influence the heat transfer coefficient. Optimized design of the cooling unit with high cooling
intensity and low water consumption was achieved by appropriate choice of these parameters. The
moving experimental sheet was cooled from a temperature of 900 degree of Celsia to a temperature of 50 degree of Celsia with
various configurations of nozzles. The tests shown that heat transfer coefficient was increasing with
water impingement density and impact velocity. Increasing water temperature from 20 degree of Celsia to 80 degree of Celsia
caused a decrease of the heat transfer coefficient and Leidenfrost temperature. The effect of velocity
is negligible when velocities are between 25 and 100 m/min. The cooling unit was designed
according to laboratory measurements to fulfill the stainless steel producer's requirements.
The measurements which were done in an industrial plant confirmed the accuracy of heat transfer
coefficient obtained in the laboratory. The maximum difference between laboratory and plant
measurements was 15%.",
  address="Trans Tech Publications",
  chapter="107633",
  doi="10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.936.1720",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="Trans Tech Publications",
  number="1",
  volume="936",
  year="2014",
  month="may",
  pages="1720--1724",
  publisher="Trans Tech Publications",
  type="journal article in Scopus"
}