Detail publikace

Why Polyphenols Present in Spent Coffee Grounds Inhibit the Growth of Bacteria Producing Polyhydroxyalkanoates?

Originální název

Why Polyphenols Present in Spent Coffee Grounds Inhibit the Growth of Bacteria Producing Polyhydroxyalkanoates?

Anglický název

Why Polyphenols Present in Spent Coffee Grounds Inhibit the Growth of Bacteria Producing Polyhydroxyalkanoates?

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Our study aims to suggest detoxification methodology, which would enable to extract phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds (SCG) hydrolysates to produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates. SCG arises as waste products through the production of instant coffee and coffee brewing. SCG contains oil and lignocellulosic phases, which can be used as carbon substrates for bacteria producing polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Fermentable sugars are transformed from SCG via chemical hydrolysis. However, hydrolysates contain also phenolic compounds, which are toxic for PHA’ producing bacteria and partially or completely inhibit their growth. On the other side, coffee polyphenols can be used as antioxidants and antimicrobial agents in many applications. Our results showed that the multi-stepped extractions’ methodology enabled to extract phenolic compounds with high antibacterial activity and produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates from which PHA producing bacteria may profit. This work was funded through the project SoMoPro (6SA18032) with funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie and the South Moravian Region (No 66586).

Anglický abstrakt

Our study aims to suggest detoxification methodology, which would enable to extract phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds (SCG) hydrolysates to produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates. SCG arises as waste products through the production of instant coffee and coffee brewing. SCG contains oil and lignocellulosic phases, which can be used as carbon substrates for bacteria producing polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Fermentable sugars are transformed from SCG via chemical hydrolysis. However, hydrolysates contain also phenolic compounds, which are toxic for PHA’ producing bacteria and partially or completely inhibit their growth. On the other side, coffee polyphenols can be used as antioxidants and antimicrobial agents in many applications. Our results showed that the multi-stepped extractions’ methodology enabled to extract phenolic compounds with high antibacterial activity and produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates from which PHA producing bacteria may profit. This work was funded through the project SoMoPro (6SA18032) with funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie and the South Moravian Region (No 66586).

BibTex


@proceedings{BUT148467,
  author="Adriána {Kovalčík} and Petra {Matoušková} and Dan {Kučera} and Stanislav {Obruča} and Ivana {Márová}",
  title="Why Polyphenols Present in Spent Coffee Grounds Inhibit the Growth of Bacteria Producing
Polyhydroxyalkanoates?",
  annote="Our study aims to suggest detoxification methodology, which would enable to extract phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds (SCG) hydrolysates to produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates. SCG arises as waste products through the production of instant coffee and coffee brewing. SCG contains oil and lignocellulosic phases, which can be used as carbon substrates for bacteria producing polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Fermentable sugars are transformed from SCG via chemical hydrolysis. However, hydrolysates contain also phenolic compounds, which are toxic for PHA’ producing bacteria and partially or completely inhibit their growth. On the other side, coffee polyphenols can be used as antioxidants and antimicrobial agents in many applications. Our results showed that the multi-stepped extractions’ methodology enabled to extract phenolic compounds with high antibacterial activity and produce inhibitor-free hydrolysates from which PHA producing bacteria may profit. This work was funded through the project SoMoPro (6SA18032) with funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie and the
South Moravian Region (No 66586).",
  address="ETA-Florence Renewable Energies",
  booktitle="EUBCE 2018, 26th EUROPEAN BIOMASS CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION, 14-17 MAY CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK, BELLA CENTER, CONFERENCE PROGRAMME",
  chapter="148467",
  edition="EUBCE 2018",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="ETA-Florence Renewable Energies",
  year="2018",
  month="april",
  pages="20--20",
  publisher="ETA-Florence Renewable Energies",
  type="conference proceedings"
}