Detail publikace

Perceptual Features as Markers of Parkinson’s Disease: The Issue of Clinical Interpretability

Originální název

Perceptual Features as Markers of Parkinson’s Disease: The Issue of Clinical Interpretability

Anglický název

Perceptual Features as Markers of Parkinson’s Disease: The Issue of Clinical Interpretability

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Up to 90 % of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from hypokinetic dysathria (HD) which is also manifested in the field of phonation. Clinical signs of HD like monoloudness, monopitch or hoarse voice are usually quantified by conventional clinical interpretable features (jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio, etc.). This paper provides large and robust insight into perceptual analysis of 5 Czech vowels of 84 PD patients and proves that despite the clinical inexplicability the perceptual features outperform the conventional ones, especially in terms of discrimination power (classification accuracy ACC=92 %, sensitivity SEN=93 %, specificity SPE=92 %) and partial correlation with clinical scores like UPDRS (Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination) or FOG (Freezing of gait questionnaire), where p < 0.0001.

Anglický abstrakt

Up to 90 % of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from hypokinetic dysathria (HD) which is also manifested in the field of phonation. Clinical signs of HD like monoloudness, monopitch or hoarse voice are usually quantified by conventional clinical interpretable features (jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio, etc.). This paper provides large and robust insight into perceptual analysis of 5 Czech vowels of 84 PD patients and proves that despite the clinical inexplicability the perceptual features outperform the conventional ones, especially in terms of discrimination power (classification accuracy ACC=92 %, sensitivity SEN=93 %, specificity SPE=92 %) and partial correlation with clinical scores like UPDRS (Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination) or FOG (Freezing of gait questionnaire), where p < 0.0001.

BibTex


@inbook{BUT123875,
  author="Jiří {Mekyska} and Zdeněk {Smékal} and Zoltán {Galáž} and Zdeněk {Mžourek} and Irena {Rektorová} and Marcos {Faúndez Zanuy} and Karmele {Lopez-de-Ipina}",
  title="Perceptual Features as Markers of Parkinson’s Disease: The Issue of Clinical Interpretability",
  annote="Up to 90 % of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from hypokinetic dysathria (HD) which is also manifested in the field of phonation. Clinical signs of HD like monoloudness, monopitch or hoarse voice are usually quantified by conventional clinical interpretable features (jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio, etc.). This paper provides large and robust insight into perceptual analysis of 5 Czech vowels of 84 PD patients and proves that despite the clinical inexplicability the perceptual features outperform the conventional ones, especially in terms of discrimination power (classification accuracy ACC=92 %, sensitivity SEN=93 %, specificity SPE=92 %) and partial correlation with clinical scores like UPDRS (Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination) or FOG (Freezing of gait questionnaire), where p < 0.0001.",
  address="Springer International Publishing",
  booktitle="Recent Advances in Nonlinear Speech Processing",
  chapter="123875",
  doi="10.1007/978-3-319-28109-4_9",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="Springer International Publishing",
  year="2016",
  month="january",
  pages="83--91",
  publisher="Springer International Publishing",
  type="book chapter"
}