Detail publikace

Model of Temperature Distribution of Thick Film Heating Element

Originální název

Model of Temperature Distribution of Thick Film Heating Element

Anglický název

Model of Temperature Distribution of Thick Film Heating Element

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

This paper is focused on the modelling of temperature distribution in ANSYS. An objective is to obtain a temperature distribution of a heater, which can be used for a transcutaneous blood gas sensor. The best temperature for measurements in this application should be in the range from 43,5°C to 44,5°C [1]. Therefore, a maximum and minimum temperature of the sensing area should be found in this range to ensure the best conditions during measurements. If the temperature distribution of the heater is described and then confirmed by an experiment, new heater design can be created without a need of new experiments and measurements. It results in a low cost and high-speed solution of the design process.

Anglický abstrakt

This paper is focused on the modelling of temperature distribution in ANSYS. An objective is to obtain a temperature distribution of a heater, which can be used for a transcutaneous blood gas sensor. The best temperature for measurements in this application should be in the range from 43,5°C to 44,5°C [1]. Therefore, a maximum and minimum temperature of the sensing area should be found in this range to ensure the best conditions during measurements. If the temperature distribution of the heater is described and then confirmed by an experiment, new heater design can be created without a need of new experiments and measurements. It results in a low cost and high-speed solution of the design process.

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT6562,
  author="Jaromír {Bílek} and Ivan {Szendiuch}",
  title="Model of Temperature Distribution of Thick Film Heating Element",
  annote="This paper is focused on the modelling of temperature distribution in ANSYS. An objective is to obtain a temperature distribution of a heater, which can be used for a transcutaneous blood gas sensor. The best temperature for measurements in this application should be in the range from 43,5°C to 44,5°C [1]. Therefore, a maximum and minimum temperature of the sensing area should be found in this range to ensure the best conditions during measurements.
If the temperature distribution of the heater is described and then confirmed by an experiment, new heater design can be created without a need of new experiments and measurements. It results in a low cost and high-speed solution of the design process.",
  address="Ing. Zdeněk Novotný, CSc., Brno",
  booktitle="Electronic Devices and Systems 2001",
  chapter="6562",
  institution="Ing. Zdeněk Novotný, CSc., Brno",
  year="2001",
  month="november",
  pages="248",
  publisher="Ing. Zdeněk Novotný, CSc., Brno",
  type="conference paper"
}