Detail publikace

Influence of Current and Kind of Gas on the Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in the Water Solutions

Originální název

Influence of Current and Kind of Gas on the Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in the Water Solutions

Anglický název

Influence of Current and Kind of Gas on the Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in the Water Solutions

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

This contribution presents results of underwater electric discharge created in the bubbles in NaH2PO4.2H2O solution. This discharge configuration is relatively new one and fully combines both gas and liquid phase discharges. The gas bubbles are introduced into the system by thin stainless steel capillary that plays simultaneously a role of HV pin electrode; water solution of low conductivity up to 0.05 mS is grounded. Thus the HV pin electrode is covered by thin gas layers and the discharge is generated in the gas phase in pin to plane configuration. The discharge streamers (plasma channels) generated in the gas phase are long enough (up to 1 cm) and thus they introduce into the liquid phase and further propagate in it. The streamer length as well as their density is growing with increase of the applied voltage. The AC voltage between 2.0-3.0 kV was used in the contemporary experiment. Discharge current was varied from 20 to 30 mA, lower currents of 10 mA and 15 mA didn't allow stable discharge operation though some streamers were observed. The hydrogen peroxide generation was studied in the time evolution; the applied voltage and discharge current were the other studied parameters. Amount of generated peroxide was more or less directly proportional to the supplied energy. Four different gases (Air, Ar, He and N2) were used for the bubble generation. Air was the most effective for the hydrogen peroxide generation, the lowest production was observed in nitrogen bubbles. This experimental result should be explained by addition of the molecular oxygen into the system that can recombine with hydrogen atoms generated by the discharge if Air was introduced. On the other hand, in case of nitrogen, a non negligible part of energy can be carried out by various metastable excited states.

Anglický abstrakt

This contribution presents results of underwater electric discharge created in the bubbles in NaH2PO4.2H2O solution. This discharge configuration is relatively new one and fully combines both gas and liquid phase discharges. The gas bubbles are introduced into the system by thin stainless steel capillary that plays simultaneously a role of HV pin electrode; water solution of low conductivity up to 0.05 mS is grounded. Thus the HV pin electrode is covered by thin gas layers and the discharge is generated in the gas phase in pin to plane configuration. The discharge streamers (plasma channels) generated in the gas phase are long enough (up to 1 cm) and thus they introduce into the liquid phase and further propagate in it. The streamer length as well as their density is growing with increase of the applied voltage. The AC voltage between 2.0-3.0 kV was used in the contemporary experiment. Discharge current was varied from 20 to 30 mA, lower currents of 10 mA and 15 mA didn't allow stable discharge operation though some streamers were observed. The hydrogen peroxide generation was studied in the time evolution; the applied voltage and discharge current were the other studied parameters. Amount of generated peroxide was more or less directly proportional to the supplied energy. Four different gases (Air, Ar, He and N2) were used for the bubble generation. Air was the most effective for the hydrogen peroxide generation, the lowest production was observed in nitrogen bubbles. This experimental result should be explained by addition of the molecular oxygen into the system that can recombine with hydrogen atoms generated by the discharge if Air was introduced. On the other hand, in case of nitrogen, a non negligible part of energy can be carried out by various metastable excited states.

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT35288,
  author="Lucie {Němcová} and František {Krčma} and Anton {Nikiforov} and Christophe {Leys}",
  title="Influence of Current and Kind of Gas on the Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in the Water Solutions",
  annote="This contribution presents results of underwater electric discharge created in the bubbles in NaH2PO4.2H2O solution. This discharge configuration is relatively new one and fully combines both gas and liquid phase discharges. The gas bubbles are introduced into the system by thin stainless steel capillary that plays simultaneously a role of HV pin electrode; water solution of low conductivity up to 0.05 mS is grounded. Thus the HV pin electrode is covered by thin gas layers and the discharge is generated in the gas phase in pin to plane configuration. The discharge streamers (plasma channels) generated in the gas phase are long enough (up to 1 cm) and thus they introduce into the liquid phase and further propagate in it. The streamer length as well as their density is growing with increase of the applied voltage. The AC voltage between 2.0-3.0 kV was used in the contemporary experiment. Discharge current was varied from 20 to 30 mA, lower currents of 10 mA and 15 mA didn't allow stable discharge operation though some streamers were observed. The hydrogen peroxide generation was studied in the time evolution; the applied voltage and discharge current were the other studied parameters. Amount of generated peroxide was more or less directly proportional to the supplied energy. Four different gases (Air, Ar, He and N2) were used for the bubble generation. Air was the most effective for the hydrogen peroxide generation, the lowest production was observed in nitrogen bubbles. This experimental result should be explained by addition of the molecular oxygen into the system that can recombine with hydrogen atoms generated by the discharge if Air was introduced. On the other hand, in case of nitrogen, a non negligible part of energy can be carried out by various metastable excited states.",
  booktitle="HAKONE XII - Book of Contributed Papers",
  chapter="35288",
  howpublished="print",
  year="2010",
  month="september",
  pages="398--401",
  type="conference paper"
}