Detail publikace

Front-to-Back Blending with Early Fragment Discarding

Originální název

Front-to-Back Blending with Early Fragment Discarding

Anglický název

Front-to-Back Blending with Early Fragment Discarding

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Alpha-blending is a frequently used technique implemented in graphics hardware to achieve effects like transparency, volume rendering, displaying particle systems and others. A common approach to using blending is to sort objects from the furthest to closest (back-to-front) and render them in this order. However, the inverse order can be used with some small modifications to the blending process. This paper introduces an approach to use the front-to-back rendering order to discard fragments of rendered polygons that would not influence the visual result and thus speed the rendering up. The speed gain and visual compromises are measured in several scenarios simulating practical situations and the measured results are discussed and conclusions are drawn.

Anglický abstrakt

Alpha-blending is a frequently used technique implemented in graphics hardware to achieve effects like transparency, volume rendering, displaying particle systems and others. A common approach to using blending is to sort objects from the furthest to closest (back-to-front) and render them in this order. However, the inverse order can be used with some small modifications to the blending process. This paper introduces an approach to use the front-to-back rendering order to discard fragments of rendered polygons that would not influence the visual result and thus speed the rendering up. The speed gain and visual compromises are measured in several scenarios simulating practical situations and the measured results are discussed and conclusions are drawn.

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT34821,
  author="Adam {Vlček} and Jiří {Havel} and Adam {Herout}",
  title="Front-to-Back Blending with Early Fragment Discarding",
  annote="Alpha-blending is a frequently used technique implemented in graphics hardware to
achieve effects like transparency, volume rendering, displaying particle systems
and others. A common approach to using blending is to sort objects from the
furthest to closest (back-to-front) and render them in this order. However, the
inverse order can be used with some small modifications to the blending process.
This paper introduces an approach to use the front-to-back rendering order to
discard fragments of rendered polygons that would not influence the visual result
and thus speed the rendering up. The speed gain and visual compromises are
measured in several scenarios simulating practical situations and the measured
results are discussed and conclusions are drawn.",
  address="Comenius University in Bratislava",
  booktitle="Proceedings of Spring Conference on Computer Graphics",
  chapter="34821",
  edition="NEUVEDEN",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="Comenius University in Bratislava",
  year="2010",
  month="may",
  pages="91--97",
  publisher="Comenius University in Bratislava",
  type="conference paper"
}