Detail publikace

In-vehicle channel sounding in the 5.8-GHz band

Originální název

In-vehicle channel sounding in the 5.8-GHz band

Anglický název

In-vehicle channel sounding in the 5.8-GHz band

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The article reports vehicular channel measurements in the frequency band of 5.8 GHz for IEEE 802.11p standard. Experiments for both intra-vehicle and out-of-vehicle environments were carried out. It was observed that the large-scale variations (LSVs) of the power delay profiles (PDPs) can be best described through a two-term exponential decay model, in contrast to the linear models which are suitable for popular ultra-wideband (UWB) systems operating in the 3- to 11-GHz band. The small-scale variations (SSVs) are separated from the PDP by subtracting the LSV and characterized utilizing logistic, generalized extreme value (GEV), and normal distributions. Two sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests validated that the logistic distribution is optimal for in-car, whereas the GEV distribution serves better for out-of-car measurements. For each measurement, the LSV trend was used to construct the respective channel impulse response (CIR), i.e., tap gains at different delays. Next, the CIR information is fed to an 802.11p simulation testbed to evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance, following a Rician model. The BER results strongly vouch for the suitability of the protocol for in-car as well as out-of-car wireless applications in stationary environments.

Anglický abstrakt

The article reports vehicular channel measurements in the frequency band of 5.8 GHz for IEEE 802.11p standard. Experiments for both intra-vehicle and out-of-vehicle environments were carried out. It was observed that the large-scale variations (LSVs) of the power delay profiles (PDPs) can be best described through a two-term exponential decay model, in contrast to the linear models which are suitable for popular ultra-wideband (UWB) systems operating in the 3- to 11-GHz band. The small-scale variations (SSVs) are separated from the PDP by subtracting the LSV and characterized utilizing logistic, generalized extreme value (GEV), and normal distributions. Two sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests validated that the logistic distribution is optimal for in-car, whereas the GEV distribution serves better for out-of-car measurements. For each measurement, the LSV trend was used to construct the respective channel impulse response (CIR), i.e., tap gains at different delays. Next, the CIR information is fed to an 802.11p simulation testbed to evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance, following a Rician model. The BER results strongly vouch for the suitability of the protocol for in-car as well as out-of-car wireless applications in stationary environments.

Plný text v Digitální knihovně

BibTex


@article{BUT112127,
  author="Pavel {Kukolev} and Aniruddha {Chandra} and Tomáš {Mikulášek} and Aleš {Prokeš} and Thomas {Zemen} and Christoph {Mecklenbräuker}",
  title="In-vehicle channel sounding in the 5.8-GHz band",
  annote="The article reports vehicular channel measurements in the frequency band of 5.8 GHz for IEEE 802.11p standard. Experiments for both intra-vehicle and out-of-vehicle environments were carried out. It was observed that the large-scale variations (LSVs) of the power delay profiles (PDPs) can be best described through a two-term exponential decay model, in contrast to the linear models which are suitable for popular ultra-wideband (UWB) systems operating in the 3- to 11-GHz band. The small-scale variations (SSVs) are separated from the PDP by subtracting the LSV and characterized utilizing logistic, generalized extreme value (GEV), and normal distributions. Two sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests validated that the logistic distribution is optimal for in-car, whereas the GEV distribution serves better for out-of-car measurements. For each measurement, the LSV trend was used to construct the respective channel impulse response (CIR), i.e., tap gains at different delays. Next, the CIR information is fed to an 802.11p simulation testbed to evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance, following a Rician model. The BER results strongly vouch for the suitability of the protocol for in-car as well as out-of-car wireless applications in stationary environments.",
  address="Springer",
  chapter="112127",
  doi="10.1186/s13638-015-0273-x",
  institution="Springer",
  number="1",
  volume="2015",
  year="2015",
  month="march",
  pages="1--9",
  publisher="Springer",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}