Detail publikace

On the Time Course of Synchronization Patterns of Neuronal Discharges in the Human Brain during Cognitive Tasks

Originální název

On the Time Course of Synchronization Patterns of Neuronal Discharges in the Human Brain during Cognitive Tasks

Anglický název

On the Time Course of Synchronization Patterns of Neuronal Discharges in the Human Brain during Cognitive Tasks

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Using intracerebral EEG recordings in a large cohort of human subjects, we investigate the time course of neural cross-talk during a simple cognitive task. Our results show that human brain dynamics undergo a characteristic sequence of synchronization patterns across different frequency bands following a visual oddball stimulus. In particular, an initial global reorganization in the delta and theta bands (2–8 Hz) is followed by gamma (20–95 Hz) and then beta band (12–20 Hz) synchrony.

Anglický abstrakt

Using intracerebral EEG recordings in a large cohort of human subjects, we investigate the time course of neural cross-talk during a simple cognitive task. Our results show that human brain dynamics undergo a characteristic sequence of synchronization patterns across different frequency bands following a visual oddball stimulus. In particular, an initial global reorganization in the delta and theta bands (2–8 Hz) is followed by gamma (20–95 Hz) and then beta band (12–20 Hz) synchrony.

BibTex


@article{BUT101110,
  author="Milan {Brázdil} and Jiří {Janeček} and Petr {Klimeš} and Radek {Mareček} and Robert {Roman} and Pavel {Jurák} and Jan {Chládek} and Pavel {Daniel} and Ivan {Rektor} and Josef {Halámek} and Filip {Plešinger} and Viktor {Jirsa}",
  title="On the Time Course of Synchronization Patterns of Neuronal Discharges in the Human Brain during Cognitive Tasks",
  annote="Using intracerebral EEG recordings in a large cohort of human subjects, we investigate the time course of neural cross-talk
during a simple cognitive task. Our results show that human brain dynamics undergo a characteristic sequence of
synchronization patterns across different frequency bands following a visual oddball stimulus. In particular, an initial global
reorganization in the delta and theta bands (2–8 Hz) is followed by gamma (20–95 Hz) and then beta band (12–20 Hz)
synchrony.",
  chapter="101110",
  doi="10.1371/journal.pone.0063293",
  number="5",
  volume="8",
  year="2013",
  month="may",
  pages="1--10",
  type="journal article"
}