Detail publikace

Microbubbles as safety issue of pulsed electric field ablation methods

Originální název

Microbubbles as safety issue of pulsed electric field ablation methods

Anglický název

Microbubbles as safety issue of pulsed electric field ablation methods

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The gaseous micro bubbles release is the main complication of left sided cardiac catheter ablation. Cerebral vessel occlusion results in subclinical "silent" ischemia or manifests as stroke, however other organs may also be affected. Active search for microbubble formation – caused by either manipulation or nature of utilized energy – is essential in all developing and established catheterization methods. Radiofrequency ablation (RF) cause gaseous bubble formation during excessive heating, while, pulsed electric field (PEF electroporation) were reported to elicit bubbles during milliseconds of application. We proposed microbubble formation description during catheter RF and PEF energy application using were quadrupolar ablation catheters with/without active flushing and high-speed microscope mounted camera (ORCA- Flash4.0 LT, Hamamatsu). Size, volume and number of microbubbles was quantified using image processing. Dynamics of gas formation in the bubbles was followed up to 20 seconds after the ablation energy application. The experiment was performed in circulation tubing and custom-made microfluidic chamber (1,2cm x 1 cm, PDMS), allowing precise readouts even in relatively high fluid flow. The open system with elevated fluid level in 1330mm, above catheter position, mimicked human blood pressure situation and had constant flow. The system was filled with 0,9g/l sodium chloride or human plasma and perfused by peristaltic pump, generating shear conditions equivalent to left coronary artery, calculated for 3mm diameter tubing, used in experiment. Two application catheters were introduced into the flowing fluid and connected to ablation generator. Tips of catheters were monitored for eventual bubble formation as well as the microfluidic chamber. Background flow of bubbles was recorded as negative and agitated saline as positive control. Bubble trap and 0,4um filter was used, preventing recirculation of bubbles.

Anglický abstrakt

The gaseous micro bubbles release is the main complication of left sided cardiac catheter ablation. Cerebral vessel occlusion results in subclinical "silent" ischemia or manifests as stroke, however other organs may also be affected. Active search for microbubble formation – caused by either manipulation or nature of utilized energy – is essential in all developing and established catheterization methods. Radiofrequency ablation (RF) cause gaseous bubble formation during excessive heating, while, pulsed electric field (PEF electroporation) were reported to elicit bubbles during milliseconds of application. We proposed microbubble formation description during catheter RF and PEF energy application using were quadrupolar ablation catheters with/without active flushing and high-speed microscope mounted camera (ORCA- Flash4.0 LT, Hamamatsu). Size, volume and number of microbubbles was quantified using image processing. Dynamics of gas formation in the bubbles was followed up to 20 seconds after the ablation energy application. The experiment was performed in circulation tubing and custom-made microfluidic chamber (1,2cm x 1 cm, PDMS), allowing precise readouts even in relatively high fluid flow. The open system with elevated fluid level in 1330mm, above catheter position, mimicked human blood pressure situation and had constant flow. The system was filled with 0,9g/l sodium chloride or human plasma and perfused by peristaltic pump, generating shear conditions equivalent to left coronary artery, calculated for 3mm diameter tubing, used in experiment. Two application catheters were introduced into the flowing fluid and connected to ablation generator. Tips of catheters were monitored for eventual bubble formation as well as the microfluidic chamber. Background flow of bubbles was recorded as negative and agitated saline as positive control. Bubble trap and 0,4um filter was used, preventing recirculation of bubbles.

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT162594,
  author="Veronika {Novotná} and Dalibor {Červinka}",
  title="Microbubbles as safety issue of pulsed electric field ablation methods",
  annote="The gaseous micro bubbles release is the main complication of left sided cardiac catheter ablation. Cerebral vessel occlusion results in subclinical "silent" ischemia or manifests as stroke, however other organs may also be affected. Active search for microbubble formation – caused by either manipulation or nature of utilized energy – is essential in all developing and established catheterization methods. Radiofrequency ablation (RF) cause gaseous bubble formation during excessive heating, while, pulsed electric field (PEF electroporation) were reported to elicit bubbles during milliseconds of application. We proposed microbubble formation description during catheter RF and PEF energy application using were quadrupolar ablation catheters with/without active flushing and high-speed microscope mounted camera (ORCA- Flash4.0 LT, Hamamatsu). Size, volume and number of microbubbles was quantified using image processing. Dynamics of gas formation in the bubbles was followed up to 20 seconds after the ablation energy application. The experiment was performed in circulation tubing and custom-made microfluidic chamber (1,2cm x 1 cm, PDMS), allowing precise readouts even in relatively high fluid flow. The open system with elevated fluid level in 1330mm, above catheter position, mimicked human blood pressure situation and had constant flow. The system was filled with 0,9g/l sodium chloride or human plasma and perfused by peristaltic pump, generating shear conditions equivalent to left coronary artery, calculated for 3mm diameter tubing, used in experiment. Two application catheters were introduced into the flowing fluid and connected to ablation generator. Tips of catheters were monitored for eventual bubble formation as well as the microfluidic chamber. Background flow of bubbles was recorded as negative and agitated saline as positive control. Bubble trap and 0,4um filter was used, preventing recirculation of bubbles.
",
  booktitle="3rd World Congress on Electroporation and Pulsed Electric Fields in Biology, Medicine, and Food and Environmental Technologies",
  chapter="162594",
  howpublished="print",
  year="2019",
  month="september",
  pages="1--2"
}