Detail publikace

Heat Transfer Time Determination Based on DNA Melting Curve Analysis

Hanliang Zhu, Huanan Li, Haoqing Zhang, Zdenka Fohlerova,Sheng Ni, Levent Yobas, Jaroslav Klempa, Imrich Gablech, Jaromir Hubalek, Honglong Chang, Pavel Neuzil

Originální název

Heat Transfer Time Determination Based on DNA Melting Curve Analysis

Anglický název

Heat Transfer Time Determination Based on DNA Melting Curve Analysis

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The determination of the physical properties of fluids – such as the thermal characteristics, which include heat transfer time (Δt) – is becoming more challenging as system sizes shrink to micro and nanometer scales. Hence, knowledge of these properties is crucial for the operation of devices requiring precise temperature (T) control, such as polymerase chain reactions, melting curve analysis (MCA), and differential scanning fluorimetry. In this paper, we introduced a flow-through microfluidic system to analyze and compare thermal properties such as Δt among samples and the sidewall of a silicon chip using microscopic image analysis. We performed a spatial MCA with double-stranded deoxynucleic acid (dsDNA) and EvaGreen intercalator, using a flow-through microfluidic chip, and achieved a T gradient of ≈ 2.23 K·mm−1. We calculated the mean value of Δt as ≈ 33.9 ms from a melting temperature (TM) location shift along the microchannel for a variable flow rate. Our system had a T resolution of ≈ 1.2 mK·pixel-1 to distinguish different dsDNA molecules – based on the TM location within the chip – providing an option to use it as a high-throughput device for rapid DNA or protein analysis.

Anglický abstrakt

The determination of the physical properties of fluids – such as the thermal characteristics, which include heat transfer time (Δt) – is becoming more challenging as system sizes shrink to micro and nanometer scales. Hence, knowledge of these properties is crucial for the operation of devices requiring precise temperature (T) control, such as polymerase chain reactions, melting curve analysis (MCA), and differential scanning fluorimetry. In this paper, we introduced a flow-through microfluidic system to analyze and compare thermal properties such as Δt among samples and the sidewall of a silicon chip using microscopic image analysis. We performed a spatial MCA with double-stranded deoxynucleic acid (dsDNA) and EvaGreen intercalator, using a flow-through microfluidic chip, and achieved a T gradient of ≈ 2.23 K·mm−1. We calculated the mean value of Δt as ≈ 33.9 ms from a melting temperature (TM) location shift along the microchannel for a variable flow rate. Our system had a T resolution of ≈ 1.2 mK·pixel-1 to distinguish different dsDNA molecules – based on the TM location within the chip – providing an option to use it as a high-throughput device for rapid DNA or protein analysis.

Dokumenty

BibTex


@article{BUT157899,
  author="Zdenka {Fohlerová} and Imrich {Gablech} and Jaromír {Hubálek} and Pavel {Neužil} and Jaroslav {Klempa}",
  title="Heat Transfer Time Determination Based on DNA Melting Curve Analysis",
  annote="The determination of the physical properties of fluids – such as the thermal characteristics, which include heat transfer time (Δt) – is becoming more challenging as system sizes shrink to micro and nanometer scales. Hence, knowledge of these properties is crucial for the operation of devices requiring precise temperature (T) control, such as polymerase chain reactions, melting curve analysis (MCA), and differential scanning fluorimetry. In this paper, we introduced a flow-through microfluidic system to analyze and compare thermal properties such as Δt among samples and the sidewall of a silicon chip using microscopic image analysis. We performed a spatial MCA with double-stranded deoxynucleic acid (dsDNA) and EvaGreen intercalator, using a flow-through microfluidic chip, and achieved a T gradient of ≈ 2.23 K·mm−1. We calculated the mean value of Δt as ≈ 33.9 ms from a melting temperature (TM) location shift along the microchannel for a variable flow rate. Our system had a T resolution of ≈ 1.2 mK·pixel-1 to distinguish different dsDNA molecules – based on the TM location within the chip – providing an option to use it as a high-throughput device for rapid DNA or protein analysis.",
  chapter="157899",
  doi="10.1007/s10404-019-2308-9",
  howpublished="print",
  number="10",
  year="2020",
  month="january",
  pages="1--7",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}