Detail publikace

Bioelectronical device for electrostimulation of stem cells

Originální název

Bioelectronical device for electrostimulation of stem cells

Anglický název

Bioelectronical device for electrostimulation of stem cells

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show the unique ability of differentiation to any cell type within an organism (e.g. neurons, myocytes, bone cells, etc.). Thus they may serve as an excellent tool in regenerative medicine. However the major challenge is to make them differentiate into particular cell line and even then their immature phenotypes limit their therapeutic application in clinical practice. Current practice capitalizes on mechanical and chemical cues, such as special scaffolds and biochemical factors to facilitate differentiation [1-3]. Recently it has been shown that electric stimulation may promote stem cell differentiation into electrogenic cell types such as neurons and cardiomyocytes [1-3]. However the inorganic materials known for not ideal biocompatibility were used as electrodes for electrostimulation and there was no clear clue between the electrostimulation pattern and the outcome of differentiation [1-3]. Our work tries to determine whether electrical stimulation of various voltage, current and frequency in combination with various organic semiconductors used as electrodes could influence the differentiation and maturation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells to other types of cells. The prototype biolectronical device for electrostimulation is be presented. The device is initial platform for testing various organic semiconductors based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with various counter anions such as polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), hyaluronic acid (HA) etc. with chemically modified surfaces in respect to biocompatibility [4]. Device is able to apply electric fields to tested iPSCs in various modes. Premature results of baseline iPSCs electric stimulation will be also presented.

Anglický abstrakt

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show the unique ability of differentiation to any cell type within an organism (e.g. neurons, myocytes, bone cells, etc.). Thus they may serve as an excellent tool in regenerative medicine. However the major challenge is to make them differentiate into particular cell line and even then their immature phenotypes limit their therapeutic application in clinical practice. Current practice capitalizes on mechanical and chemical cues, such as special scaffolds and biochemical factors to facilitate differentiation [1-3]. Recently it has been shown that electric stimulation may promote stem cell differentiation into electrogenic cell types such as neurons and cardiomyocytes [1-3]. However the inorganic materials known for not ideal biocompatibility were used as electrodes for electrostimulation and there was no clear clue between the electrostimulation pattern and the outcome of differentiation [1-3]. Our work tries to determine whether electrical stimulation of various voltage, current and frequency in combination with various organic semiconductors used as electrodes could influence the differentiation and maturation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells to other types of cells. The prototype biolectronical device for electrostimulation is be presented. The device is initial platform for testing various organic semiconductors based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with various counter anions such as polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), hyaluronic acid (HA) etc. with chemically modified surfaces in respect to biocompatibility [4]. Device is able to apply electric fields to tested iPSCs in various modes. Premature results of baseline iPSCs electric stimulation will be also presented.

BibTex


@misc{BUT155825,
  author="Jiří {Ehlich} and Ota {Salyk} and Lukáš {Omasta} and Stanislav {Stříteský} and Martin {Vala} and Martin {Weiter} and Jan {Víteček} and Lukáš {Kubala}",
  title="Bioelectronical device for electrostimulation of stem cells",
  annote="Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show
the unique ability of differentiation to any cell type within
an organism (e.g. neurons, myocytes, bone cells, etc.).
Thus they may serve as an excellent tool in regenerative
medicine. However the major challenge is to make them
differentiate into particular cell line and even then their
immature phenotypes limit their therapeutic application
in clinical practice.
Current practice capitalizes on mechanical and
chemical cues, such as special scaffolds and biochemical
factors to facilitate differentiation [1-3]. Recently it has
been shown that electric stimulation may promote stem
cell differentiation into electrogenic cell types such as
neurons and cardiomyocytes [1-3]. However the inorganic
materials known for not ideal biocompatibility were used
as electrodes for electrostimulation and there was no
clear clue between the electrostimulation pattern and the
outcome of differentiation [1-3].
Our work tries to determine whether electrical
stimulation of various voltage, current and frequency in
combination with various organic semiconductors used as
electrodes could influence the differentiation and
maturation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells to
other types of cells.
The prototype biolectronical device for
electrostimulation is be presented. The device is initial
platform for testing various organic semiconductors
based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with
various counter anions such as polystyrene sulfonate
(PSS), hyaluronic acid (HA) etc. with chemically modified
surfaces in respect to biocompatibility [4].
Device is able to apply electric fields to tested iPSCs in
various modes. Premature results of baseline iPSCs
electric stimulation will be also presented.",
  address="Vysoké učení technické v Brně, Fakulta chemická, Purkyňova 464/118, 612 00 Brno",
  booktitle="7th Meeting on Chemistry and Life 2018. Book of abstracts",
  chapter="155825",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="Vysoké učení technické v Brně, Fakulta chemická, Purkyňova 464/118, 612 00 Brno",
  year="2018",
  month="september",
  publisher="Vysoké učení technické v Brně, Fakulta chemická, Purkyňova 464/118, 612 00 Brno",
  type="abstract"
}