Detail publikace

PHA granules help bacterial cells to preserve cell integrity when exposed to sudden osmotic imbalances

Originální název

PHA granules help bacterial cells to preserve cell integrity when exposed to sudden osmotic imbalances

Anglický název

PHA granules help bacterial cells to preserve cell integrity when exposed to sudden osmotic imbalances

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are microbial polyesters which accumulate as intracellular granules in numerous prokaryotes and mainly serve as storage materials; beyond this primary function, PHA also enhance the robustness of bacteria against various stress factors. We have observed that the presence of PHA in bacterial cells substantially enhances their ability to maintain cell integrity when suddenly exposed to osmotic imbalances. In the case of the non-halophilic bacterium Cupriavidus necator, the presence of PHA decreased plasmolysis-induced cytoplasmic membrane damage during osmotic up-shock, which subsequently enabled the cells to withstand subsequent osmotic downshock. In contrast, sudden induction of osmotic up-and subsequent down-shock resulted in massive hypotonic lysis of non-PHA containing cells as determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetrical Analysis. Furthermore, a protective effect of PHA against hypotonic lysis was also observed in the case of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila; here, challenged PHA-rich cells were capable of retaining cell integrity more effectively than their PHA-poor counterparts. Hence, it appears that the fact that PHA granules, as an added value to their primary storage function, protect halophiles from the harmful effect of osmotic down-shock might explain why PHA accumulation is such a common feature among halophilic prokaryotes. The results of this study, apart from their fundamental importance, are also of practical biotechnological significance: because PHA-rich bacterial cells are resistant to osmotic imbalances, they could be utilized in in-situ bioremediation technologies or during enrichment of mixed microbial consortia in PHA producers under conditions of fluctuating salinity.

Anglický abstrakt

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are microbial polyesters which accumulate as intracellular granules in numerous prokaryotes and mainly serve as storage materials; beyond this primary function, PHA also enhance the robustness of bacteria against various stress factors. We have observed that the presence of PHA in bacterial cells substantially enhances their ability to maintain cell integrity when suddenly exposed to osmotic imbalances. In the case of the non-halophilic bacterium Cupriavidus necator, the presence of PHA decreased plasmolysis-induced cytoplasmic membrane damage during osmotic up-shock, which subsequently enabled the cells to withstand subsequent osmotic downshock. In contrast, sudden induction of osmotic up-and subsequent down-shock resulted in massive hypotonic lysis of non-PHA containing cells as determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetrical Analysis. Furthermore, a protective effect of PHA against hypotonic lysis was also observed in the case of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila; here, challenged PHA-rich cells were capable of retaining cell integrity more effectively than their PHA-poor counterparts. Hence, it appears that the fact that PHA granules, as an added value to their primary storage function, protect halophiles from the harmful effect of osmotic down-shock might explain why PHA accumulation is such a common feature among halophilic prokaryotes. The results of this study, apart from their fundamental importance, are also of practical biotechnological significance: because PHA-rich bacterial cells are resistant to osmotic imbalances, they could be utilized in in-situ bioremediation technologies or during enrichment of mixed microbial consortia in PHA producers under conditions of fluctuating salinity.

BibTex


@article{BUT152010,
  author="Petr {Sedláček} and Eva {Slaninová} and Ivana {Márová} and Stanislav {Obruča}",
  title="PHA granules help bacterial cells to preserve cell integrity when exposed to sudden osmotic imbalances",
  annote="Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are microbial polyesters which accumulate as intracellular granules in numerous prokaryotes and mainly serve as storage materials; beyond this primary function, PHA also enhance the robustness of bacteria against various stress factors. We have observed that the presence of PHA in bacterial cells substantially enhances their ability to maintain cell integrity when suddenly exposed to osmotic imbalances. In the case of the non-halophilic bacterium Cupriavidus necator, the presence of PHA decreased plasmolysis-induced cytoplasmic membrane damage during osmotic up-shock, which subsequently enabled the cells to withstand subsequent osmotic downshock. In contrast, sudden induction of osmotic up-and subsequent down-shock resulted in massive hypotonic lysis of non-PHA containing cells as determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetrical Analysis. Furthermore, a protective effect of PHA against hypotonic lysis was also observed in the case of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila; here, challenged PHA-rich cells were capable of retaining cell integrity more effectively than their PHA-poor counterparts. Hence, it appears that the fact that PHA granules, as an added value to their primary storage function, protect halophiles from the harmful effect of osmotic down-shock might explain why PHA accumulation is such a common feature among halophilic prokaryotes. The results of this study, apart from their fundamental importance, are also of practical biotechnological significance: because PHA-rich bacterial cells are resistant to osmotic imbalances, they could be utilized in in-situ bioremediation technologies or during enrichment of mixed microbial consortia in PHA producers under conditions of fluctuating salinity.",
  address="Elsevier",
  chapter="152010",
  doi="10.1016/j.nbt.2018.10.005",
  institution="Elsevier",
  number="3",
  volume="49",
  year="2019",
  month="march",
  pages="129--136",
  publisher="Elsevier",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}