Detail publikace

Multi-frequency rapid-scan HFEPR

Originální název

Multi-frequency rapid-scan HFEPR

Anglický název

Multi-frequency rapid-scan HFEPR

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Gaining access to electron spin dynamics at (sub-)THz frequencies is highly challenging. However, this information is highly relevant for the understanding and development of spin polarization agents in dynamic nuclear polarization methods and single-molecule magnets for quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the first rapid-scan EPR experiment in 200 GHz frequency region. A voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) generated fast sinusoidal frequency sweeps with scan rates up to 3  105 THz/s after the frequency multiplication, which is equal to 107 T/s in field representation. Such high scan rates provide access to extremely short relaxation times T2 ¼ ð2p  sweep rateÞ0:5  1 ns. The absence of a microwave cavity allowed us to perform multi-frequency experiments in the 170–250 GHz range. A further advantage of a cavity-less approach is the possibility to use vast sweeps, which in turn, allows the deconvolution using a linear sweep function. The deconvoluted spectra obtained with this method are identical to the slow-rate spectrum. We find spin-spin relaxation times of several nanoseconds for pure LiPc samples in this frequency range. These values cannot be obtained by means of conventional pulsed EPR methods.

Anglický abstrakt

Gaining access to electron spin dynamics at (sub-)THz frequencies is highly challenging. However, this information is highly relevant for the understanding and development of spin polarization agents in dynamic nuclear polarization methods and single-molecule magnets for quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the first rapid-scan EPR experiment in 200 GHz frequency region. A voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) generated fast sinusoidal frequency sweeps with scan rates up to 3  105 THz/s after the frequency multiplication, which is equal to 107 T/s in field representation. Such high scan rates provide access to extremely short relaxation times T2 ¼ ð2p  sweep rateÞ0:5  1 ns. The absence of a microwave cavity allowed us to perform multi-frequency experiments in the 170–250 GHz range. A further advantage of a cavity-less approach is the possibility to use vast sweeps, which in turn, allows the deconvolution using a linear sweep function. The deconvoluted spectra obtained with this method are identical to the slow-rate spectrum. We find spin-spin relaxation times of several nanoseconds for pure LiPc samples in this frequency range. These values cannot be obtained by means of conventional pulsed EPR methods.

BibTex


@article{BUT151461,
  author="Oleksii {Laguta} and Marek {Tuček} and Joris {van Slageren} and Petr {Neugebauer}",
  title="Multi-frequency rapid-scan HFEPR",
  annote="Gaining access to electron spin dynamics at (sub-)THz frequencies is highly challenging. However, this
information is highly relevant for the understanding and development of spin polarization agents in
dynamic nuclear polarization methods and single-molecule magnets for quantum computation. Here
we demonstrate the first rapid-scan EPR experiment in 200 GHz frequency region. A voltage controlled
oscillator (VCO) generated fast sinusoidal frequency sweeps with scan rates up to 3  105 THz/s after
the frequency multiplication, which is equal to 107 T/s in field representation. Such high scan rates provide
access to extremely short relaxation times T2 ¼ ð2p  sweep rateÞ0:5  1 ns. The absence of a microwave
cavity allowed us to perform multi-frequency experiments in the 170–250 GHz range. A further
advantage of a cavity-less approach is the possibility to use vast sweeps, which in turn, allows the deconvolution
using a linear sweep function. The deconvoluted spectra obtained with this method are identical
to the slow-rate spectrum. We find spin-spin relaxation times of several nanoseconds for pure LiPc samples
in this frequency range. These values cannot be obtained by means of conventional pulsed EPR
methods.",
  chapter="151461",
  doi="10.1016/j.jmr.2018.09.005",
  howpublished="print",
  number="1",
  volume="296",
  year="2018",
  month="november",
  pages="138--142",
  type="journal article"
}