Detail publikace

The Problem of Expiration of Style and the Historiography of Architecture

Originální název

The Problem of Expiration of Style and the Historiography of Architecture

Anglický název

The Problem of Expiration of Style and the Historiography of Architecture

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The essay discusses ideas about the end of styles. To use the notion “revival” in the style debate (Gothic Revival, etc.) seems to be an expression of the persuasion, that a style (Gothic) finished or died in one moment, then it did not exist for a certain period, and after that occurred again, “revived”. But is this construct correct? How can the existence of a style be stopped? Art historians invented three basic hypotheses. First, a style dies as a living organism. Second, a style continues its evolution in another culture. Third, a style disappears because it ceases to be fashionable. What serve these hypotheses for? Who likes the notion “revival” and why “revivalists” usually have not use it? How is a style retained in memory, waiting for its “revival”?

Anglický abstrakt

The essay discusses ideas about the end of styles. To use the notion “revival” in the style debate (Gothic Revival, etc.) seems to be an expression of the persuasion, that a style (Gothic) finished or died in one moment, then it did not exist for a certain period, and after that occurred again, “revived”. But is this construct correct? How can the existence of a style be stopped? Art historians invented three basic hypotheses. First, a style dies as a living organism. Second, a style continues its evolution in another culture. Third, a style disappears because it ceases to be fashionable. What serve these hypotheses for? Who likes the notion “revival” and why “revivalists” usually have not use it? How is a style retained in memory, waiting for its “revival”?

BibTex


@inbook{BUT119602,
  author="Martin {Horáček}",
  title="The Problem of Expiration of Style and the Historiography of Architecture",
  annote="The essay discusses ideas about the end of styles. To use the notion
“revival” in the style debate (Gothic Revival, etc.) seems to be an expression of the
persuasion, that a style (Gothic) finished or died in one moment, then it did not exist for a
certain period, and after that occurred again, “revived”. But is this construct correct? How
can the existence of a style be stopped? Art historians invented three basic hypotheses.
First, a style dies as a living organism. Second, a style continues its evolution in another
culture. Third, a style disappears because it ceases to be fashionable. What serve these
hypotheses for? Who likes the notion “revival” and why “revivalists” usually have not use it?
How is a style retained in memory, waiting for its “revival”?",
  address="The Courtauld Institute of Art",
  booktitle="Revival: Memories, Identities, Utopias",
  chapter="119602",
  edition="Courtauld Books Online",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="The Courtauld Institute of Art",
  year="2015",
  month="september",
  pages="86--99",
  publisher="The Courtauld Institute of Art",
  type="book chapter"
}