Detail publikace

In situ measurements of thin films in bovine serum lubricated contacts using optical interferometry

Originální název

In situ measurements of thin films in bovine serum lubricated contacts using optical interferometry

Anglický název

In situ measurements of thin films in bovine serum lubricated contacts using optical interferometry

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The aim of this study is to consider the relevance of in situ measurements of bovine serum film thickness in the optical test device that could be related to the function of the artificial hip joint. It is mainly focussed on the effect of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the transparent surface and the effect of its geometry. Film thickness measurements were performed using ball-on-disc and lens-on-disc configurations of optical test device as a function of time. Chromatic interferograms were recorded with a high-speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor digital camera and evaluated with thin film colorimetric interferometry. It was clarified that a chromium layer covering the glass disc has a hydrophobic behaviour which supports the adsorption of proteins contained in the bovine serum solution, thereby a thicker lubricating film is formed. On the contrary, the protein film formation was not observed when the disc was covered with a silica layer having a hydrophilic behaviour. In this case, a very thin lubricating film was formed only due to the hydrodynamic effect. Metal and ceramic balls have no substantial effect on lubricant film formation although their contact surfaces have relatively different wettability. It was confirmed that conformity of contacting surfaces and kinematic conditions has fundamental effect on bovine serum film formation. In the ball-on-disc configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to protein aggregations, which pass through the contact zone and increase the film thickness. In the more conformal ball-on-lens configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to hydrodynamic effect, thereby the film thickness is kept constant during measurement.

Anglický abstrakt

The aim of this study is to consider the relevance of in situ measurements of bovine serum film thickness in the optical test device that could be related to the function of the artificial hip joint. It is mainly focussed on the effect of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the transparent surface and the effect of its geometry. Film thickness measurements were performed using ball-on-disc and lens-on-disc configurations of optical test device as a function of time. Chromatic interferograms were recorded with a high-speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor digital camera and evaluated with thin film colorimetric interferometry. It was clarified that a chromium layer covering the glass disc has a hydrophobic behaviour which supports the adsorption of proteins contained in the bovine serum solution, thereby a thicker lubricating film is formed. On the contrary, the protein film formation was not observed when the disc was covered with a silica layer having a hydrophilic behaviour. In this case, a very thin lubricating film was formed only due to the hydrodynamic effect. Metal and ceramic balls have no substantial effect on lubricant film formation although their contact surfaces have relatively different wettability. It was confirmed that conformity of contacting surfaces and kinematic conditions has fundamental effect on bovine serum film formation. In the ball-on-disc configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to protein aggregations, which pass through the contact zone and increase the film thickness. In the more conformal ball-on-lens configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to hydrodynamic effect, thereby the film thickness is kept constant during measurement.

BibTex


@article{BUT104824,
  author="Martin {Vrbka} and Ivan {Křupka} and Martin {Hartl} and Tomáš {Návrat} and Jiří {Gallo}",
  title="In situ measurements of thin films in bovine serum lubricated contacts using optical interferometry",
  annote="The aim of this study is to consider the relevance of in situ measurements of bovine serum film thickness in the optical test device that could be related to the function of the artificial hip joint. It is mainly focussed on the effect of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the transparent surface and the effect of its geometry. Film thickness measurements were performed using ball-on-disc and lens-on-disc configurations of optical test device as a function of time. Chromatic interferograms were recorded with a high-speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor digital camera and evaluated with thin film colorimetric interferometry. It was clarified that a chromium layer covering the glass disc has a hydrophobic behaviour which supports the adsorption of proteins contained in the bovine serum solution, thereby a thicker lubricating film is formed. On the contrary, the protein film formation was not observed when the disc was covered with a silica layer having a hydrophilic behaviour. In this case, a very thin lubricating film was formed only due to the hydrodynamic effect. Metal and ceramic balls have no substantial effect on lubricant film formation although their contact surfaces have relatively different wettability. It was confirmed that conformity of contacting surfaces and kinematic conditions has fundamental effect on bovine serum film formation. In the ball-on-disc configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to protein aggregations, which pass through the contact zone and increase the film thickness. In the more conformal ball-on-lens configuration, the lubricant film is formed predominantly due to hydrodynamic effect, thereby the film thickness is kept constant during measurement.",
  address="SAGE Publications Ltd",
  chapter="104824",
  doi="10.1177/0954411913517498",
  institution="SAGE Publications Ltd",
  number="2",
  volume="228",
  year="2014",
  month="january",
  pages="149--158",
  publisher="SAGE Publications Ltd",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}