Detail publikace

The 3D imaging of mesenchymal stem cells on porous scaffolds using high-contrasted x-ray computed nanotomography

VOJTOVÁ, L. ZIKMUND, T. PAVLIŇÁKOVÁ, V. ŠALPLACHTA, J. KALASOVÁ, D. PROSECKÁ, E. BRTNÍKOVÁ, J. ŽÍDEK, J. PAVLIŇÁK, D. KAISER, J.

Originální název

The 3D imaging of mesenchymal stem cells on porous scaffolds using high-contrasted x-ray computed nanotomography

Anglický název

The 3D imaging of mesenchymal stem cells on porous scaffolds using high-contrasted x-ray computed nanotomography

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

This study presents an X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) based, high-resolution imaging technique. Thanks to a voxel resolution of 540 nm, this novel technique is suitable for observing the 3D morphology of soft biopolymeric scaffolds seeded with stem cells. A sample of highly porous collagen scaffold seeded with contrasted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) was investigated by using lab-based nano-CT. The whole volume of the sample was analysed without its destruction. To evaluate the potential of nano-CT, a comparison measurement was done using a standard microscopy technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) established an extension and local accumulation of the contrasting agent – heavy metallic osmium tetroxide. The presented imaging technique is novel as it will help to understand better the behaviour of cells while interacting with three-dimensional biomaterials. This is crucial for both experimental and clinical tissue engineering applications in order to limit the risk of uncontrolled cell growth, and potentially tumour formation.

Anglický abstrakt

This study presents an X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) based, high-resolution imaging technique. Thanks to a voxel resolution of 540 nm, this novel technique is suitable for observing the 3D morphology of soft biopolymeric scaffolds seeded with stem cells. A sample of highly porous collagen scaffold seeded with contrasted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) was investigated by using lab-based nano-CT. The whole volume of the sample was analysed without its destruction. To evaluate the potential of nano-CT, a comparison measurement was done using a standard microscopy technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) established an extension and local accumulation of the contrasting agent – heavy metallic osmium tetroxide. The presented imaging technique is novel as it will help to understand better the behaviour of cells while interacting with three-dimensional biomaterials. This is crucial for both experimental and clinical tissue engineering applications in order to limit the risk of uncontrolled cell growth, and potentially tumour formation.

Dokumenty

BibTex


@article{BUT151641,
  author="Lucy {Vojtová} and Tomáš {Zikmund} and Veronika {Pavliňáková} and Jakub {Šalplachta} and Dominika {Kalasová} and Eva {Prosecká} and Jana {Brtníková} and Jan {Žídek} and Jozef {Kaiser}",
  title="The 3D imaging of mesenchymal stem cells on porous scaffolds using high-contrasted x-ray computed nanotomography",
  annote="This study presents an X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) based, high-resolution imaging technique. Thanks to a voxel resolution of 540 nm, this novel technique is suitable for observing the 3D morphology of soft biopolymeric scaffolds seeded with stem cells. A sample of highly porous collagen scaffold seeded with contrasted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) was investigated by using lab-based nano-CT. The whole volume
of the sample was analysed without its destruction. To evaluate the potential of nano-CT, a comparison measurement was done using a standard microscopy technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) established an extension and local accumulation
of the contrasting agent – heavy metallic osmium tetroxide. The presented imaging technique is novel as it will
help to understand better the behaviour of cells while interacting with three-dimensional biomaterials. This is crucial for both experimental and clinical tissue engineering applications in order to limit the risk of uncontrolled cell growth, and potentially tumour formation.",
  address="WILEY",
  chapter="151641",
  doi="10.1111/jmi.12771",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="WILEY",
  number="3",
  volume="273",
  year="2019",
  month="march",
  pages="169--177",
  publisher="WILEY",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}