Detail publikace

Serum and Tissue Zinc in Epithelial Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis

GUMULEC, J. MASAŘÍK, M. ADAM, V. ECKSCHLAGER, T. PROVAZNÍK, I. KIZEK, R.

Originální název

Serum and Tissue Zinc in Epithelial Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis

Český název

Serum and Tissue Zinc in Epithelial Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis

Anglický název

Serum and Tissue Zinc in Epithelial Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis

Typ

článek v časopise

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Background and Objectives: Current studies give us inconsistent results regarding the association of neoplasms and zinc(II) serum and tissues concentrations. The results of to-date studies using meta-analysis are summarized in this paper. Methods: Web of Science (Science citation index expanded), PubMed (Medline), Embase and CENTRAL were searched. Articles were reviewed by two evaluators; quality was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa scale; meta-analysis was performed including meta-regression and publication bias analysis. Results: Analysis was performed on 114 case control, cohort and cross-sectional studies of 22737 participants. Decreased serum zinc level was found in patients with lung (effect size =21.04), head and neck (effect size =21.43), breast (effect size =20.93), liver (effect size =22.29), stomach (effect size =21.59), and prostate (effect size =21.36) cancers; elevation was not proven in any tumor. More specific zinc patterns are evident at tissue level, showing increase in breast cancer tissue (effect size = 1.80) and decrease in prostatic (effect size =23.90), liver (effect size =28.26), lung (effect size =23.12), and thyroid cancer (effect size =22.84). The rest of the included tumors brought ambiguous results, both in serum and tissue zinc levels across the studies. The association between zinc level and stage or grade of tumor has not been revealed by meta-regression. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on cancer-specific tissue zinc level alteration. Although serum zinc decrease was associated with most tumors mentioned herein, further – prospective - studies are needed.

Český abstrakt

Background and Objectives: Current studies give us inconsistent results regarding the association of neoplasms and zinc(II) serum and tissues concentrations. The results of to-date studies using meta-analysis are summarized in this paper. Methods: Web of Science (Science citation index expanded), PubMed (Medline), Embase and CENTRAL were searched. Articles were reviewed by two evaluators; quality was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa scale; meta-analysis was performed including meta-regression and publication bias analysis. Results: Analysis was performed on 114 case control, cohort and cross-sectional studies of 22737 participants. Decreased serum zinc level was found in patients with lung (effect size =21.04), head and neck (effect size =21.43), breast (effect size =20.93), liver (effect size =22.29), stomach (effect size =21.59), and prostate (effect size =21.36) cancers; elevation was not proven in any tumor. More specific zinc patterns are evident at tissue level, showing increase in breast cancer tissue (effect size = 1.80) and decrease in prostatic (effect size =23.90), liver (effect size =28.26), lung (effect size =23.12), and thyroid cancer (effect size =22.84). The rest of the included tumors brought ambiguous results, both in serum and tissue zinc levels across the studies. The association between zinc level and stage or grade of tumor has not been revealed by meta-regression. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on cancer-specific tissue zinc level alteration. Although serum zinc decrease was associated with most tumors mentioned herein, further – prospective - studies are needed.

Anglický abstrakt

Background and Objectives: Current studies give us inconsistent results regarding the association of neoplasms and zinc(II) serum and tissues concentrations. The results of to-date studies using meta-analysis are summarized in this paper. Methods: Web of Science (Science citation index expanded), PubMed (Medline), Embase and CENTRAL were searched. Articles were reviewed by two evaluators; quality was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa scale; meta-analysis was performed including meta-regression and publication bias analysis. Results: Analysis was performed on 114 case control, cohort and cross-sectional studies of 22737 participants. Decreased serum zinc level was found in patients with lung (effect size =21.04), head and neck (effect size =21.43), breast (effect size =20.93), liver (effect size =22.29), stomach (effect size =21.59), and prostate (effect size =21.36) cancers; elevation was not proven in any tumor. More specific zinc patterns are evident at tissue level, showing increase in breast cancer tissue (effect size = 1.80) and decrease in prostatic (effect size =23.90), liver (effect size =28.26), lung (effect size =23.12), and thyroid cancer (effect size =22.84). The rest of the included tumors brought ambiguous results, both in serum and tissue zinc levels across the studies. The association between zinc level and stage or grade of tumor has not been revealed by meta-regression. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on cancer-specific tissue zinc level alteration. Although serum zinc decrease was associated with most tumors mentioned herein, further – prospective - studies are needed.

Klíčová slova

Zinc; Epithelial Malignancies; MetaAnalysis

Rok RIV

2014

Vydáno

19.06.2014

Nakladatel

PLOS

Strany od

1

Strany do

11

Strany počet

11

URL

Plný text v Digitální knihovně

BibTex


@article{BUT108004,
  author="Jaromír {Gumulec} and Michal {Masařík} and Vojtěch {Adam} and Tomáš {Eckschlager} and Ivo {Provazník} and René {Kizek}",
  title="Serum and Tissue Zinc in Epithelial Malignancies: A Meta-Analysis",
  annote="Background and Objectives: Current studies give us inconsistent results regarding the association of neoplasms and zinc(II)
serum and tissues concentrations. The results of to-date studies using meta-analysis are summarized in this paper.
Methods: Web of Science (Science citation index expanded), PubMed (Medline), Embase and CENTRAL were searched.
Articles were reviewed by two evaluators; quality was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa scale; meta-analysis was performed
including meta-regression and publication bias analysis.
Results: Analysis was performed on 114 case control, cohort and cross-sectional studies of 22737 participants. Decreased
serum zinc level was found in patients with lung (effect size =21.04), head and neck (effect size =21.43), breast (effect
size =20.93), liver (effect size =22.29), stomach (effect size =21.59), and prostate (effect size =21.36) cancers; elevation
was not proven in any tumor. More specific zinc patterns are evident at tissue level, showing increase in breast cancer tissue
(effect size = 1.80) and decrease in prostatic (effect size =23.90), liver (effect size =28.26), lung (effect size =23.12), and
thyroid cancer (effect size =22.84). The rest of the included tumors brought ambiguous results, both in serum and tissue
zinc levels across the studies. The association between zinc level and stage or grade of tumor has not been revealed by
meta-regression.
Conclusion: This study provides evidence on cancer-specific tissue zinc level alteration. Although serum zinc decrease was
associated with most tumors mentioned herein, further – prospective - studies are needed.",
  address="PLOS",
  chapter="108004",
  doi="10.1371/journal.pone.0099790",
  institution="PLOS",
  number="6",
  volume="9",
  year="2014",
  month="june",
  pages="1--11",
  publisher="PLOS",
  type="journal article"
}