Detail publikace

High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory

Originální název

High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory

Anglický název

High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

Oscillations in the high gamma (50-125Hz), ripple (125-250Hz) and fast ripple (250-500Hz) frequency bands are known to emerge from coordinated activity of neuronal assemblies but their role in cognitive functions remains elusive. We recorded high frequency oscillations (HFOs) from multiple cortical and subcortical structures in human brain during encoding and recall of a series of affectively charged images. Viewing of the images induced distributed HFOs in the primary visual, limbic and higher order cortical networks, which ranged up to 1000Hz. These induced oscillations comprised discrete events, which had characteristic latency, duration, frequency and spectral amplitude; they were differentially modulated by memory encoding and recall, and predicted the affective value and memory for the encoded images. Our results suggest that individual discharges of high frequency oscillations, generated by synchronized activity of local cortical and limbic neuronal networks, reflect a fundamental unit of human cognitive processing.

Anglický abstrakt

Oscillations in the high gamma (50-125Hz), ripple (125-250Hz) and fast ripple (250-500Hz) frequency bands are known to emerge from coordinated activity of neuronal assemblies but their role in cognitive functions remains elusive. We recorded high frequency oscillations (HFOs) from multiple cortical and subcortical structures in human brain during encoding and recall of a series of affectively charged images. Viewing of the images induced distributed HFOs in the primary visual, limbic and higher order cortical networks, which ranged up to 1000Hz. These induced oscillations comprised discrete events, which had characteristic latency, duration, frequency and spectral amplitude; they were differentially modulated by memory encoding and recall, and predicted the affective value and memory for the encoded images. Our results suggest that individual discharges of high frequency oscillations, generated by synchronized activity of local cortical and limbic neuronal networks, reflect a fundamental unit of human cognitive processing.

BibTex


@article{BUT107251,
  author="Jan {Cimbálník} and Michal T. {Kucewicz} and Joseph Y. {Matsumoto} and Benjamin H. {Brinkmann} and Mark {Bower} and Vlastimil {Sulc} and Fred {Marsh} and Gregory {Worrell}",
  title="High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory",
  annote="Oscillations in the high gamma (50-125Hz), ripple (125-250Hz) and fast ripple (250-500Hz) frequency bands are known to emerge from coordinated activity of neuronal assemblies but their role in cognitive functions remains elusive. We recorded high frequency oscillations (HFOs) from multiple cortical and subcortical structures in human brain during encoding and recall of a series of affectively charged images. Viewing of the images induced distributed HFOs in the primary visual, limbic and higher order cortical networks, which ranged up to 1000Hz. These induced oscillations comprised discrete events, which had characteristic latency, duration, frequency and spectral amplitude; they were differentially modulated by memory encoding and recall, and predicted the affective value and memory for the encoded images. Our results suggest that individual discharges of high frequency oscillations, generated by synchronized activity of local cortical and limbic neuronal networks, reflect a fundamental unit of human cognitive processing.",
  address="OXFORD UNIV PRESS, GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND",
  chapter="107251",
  doi="10.1093/brain/awu149",
  howpublished="print",
  institution="OXFORD UNIV PRESS, GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND",
  number="8",
  volume="137",
  year="2014",
  month="april",
  pages="2231--2244",
  publisher="OXFORD UNIV PRESS, GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND",
  type="journal article"
}