Branch Details

Physical and Materials Engineering

Original title in Czech: Fyzikální a materiálové inženýrstvíFSIAbbreviation: D-FMIAcad. year: 2020/2021Specialisation: Physical Engineering

Programme: Physical and Materials Engineering

Length of Study: 4 years

Accredited from: 1.1.1999Accredited until: 31.12.2024

Profile

The curriculum concentrates on the comprehensive study of materials properties and failure processes from the point of view of physics and physical metallurgy. Students should develop capability to apply their knowledge in inventive manner to new technologies and materials, such as plasma spraying, special methods of thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical treatment, etc. Special attention is paid to the degradation processes and to the synergetic effects of various materials properties on material failure. The subjects of study are metallic and non-metallic materials, e.g., structural ceramics, polymers, amorphous and nanocrystalline materials and intermetallics.
The Ph.D. programme requires proficiency in mathematics and physics at the MSc. degree level obtained from Faculty of Science or Faculty of Mechanical Engineering.

Supervisor

Issued topics of Doctoral Study Program

  1. Advanced spectral and image processing of hyperspectral data

    Recent developments in sensor technology have increased the availability of high spectral and spatial resolution hyperspectral data. This complex data contains hundreds to thousands of spectral channels with wide range of frequencies, in which each pixel represents the reflectance of the observed object. A great limitation on the efficient and accurate extraction of the requested information from the hyperspectral data is its size. Using machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques, the aim of this work is to reduce the sophistication of hyperspectral data analysis and to increase the potential of this non-destructive imaging technique for routine analysis of plant and algal plant growth. The work will also include the necessary physical and technical background measurement of hyperspectral data, development of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. It is assumed that the result of this work will be a tool for measuring, processing and evaluating hyperspectral data.

    Tutor: Šerý Mojmír, Ing., Ph.D.

  2. Application of KPFM in graphene based sensors and solar cells

    Kelvin's probe force microscopy (KPFM) is an excellent tool for mapping the distribution of surface potential locally up to nanometer resolution. This can be advantageously used in a study of charge distribution on nanometer-sized sensors and at investigation of p-n interfaces of solar cells during their operation. This new information, in addition to commonly studied sensor current responses and solar cell voltage responses, makes it easier to understand the ongoing physical processes, use this knowledge to eliminate the shortcomings of existing devices, and possibly to design higher efficiency devices. At work, you will need to master the general physical principles of KPFM, sensors and solar cells. A suitable applicant is a graduate of a Master's degree in Physics, Electrical Engineering or Chemistry.

    Tutor: Bartošík Miroslav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  3. Complex automated bioreactor for holographic microscopy

    For maximum information yield about live cells behaviour provided by coherence controlled holographic microscopy it is inevitable to design and develop complex automated bioreactor. Such a device should ensure optically suitable accommodation of live cells in the microscope with provision of control over physiological microenvironment and preprogrammed challenges. The task is to design, develop and validate the complex automated biorector for T1 holographic microscope.

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  4. Complex media imaging exploiting machine learning approaches

    In modern experimental set-ups, the use of holographic techniques is already a common standard; whether they are experiments using optical tweezers or advanced imaging techniques. This technology opens up the possibility of new applications not only in research in physics, but also in the fields of biology, medicine and others. A similar technological revolution is taking place in the field of computer science, especially thanks to a considerable step forward in the computational capabilities of modern parallelizable and distributed platforms. This makes it possible to perform complex structure calculations in virtually real time, either using traditional "white-box" models based on the numerical solution of equations or, increasingly popular, using "black-box" models of machine learning / artificial intelligence. This area has shown considerable progress over the last decade and diverse applicability across disciplines. To mention a few of the applications in the field of filtering and separation of 1D and 2D data, expert systems or so-called reinforcement learning, where the machine learns to control another machine without a teacher, only using feedback from the system. This makes it an attractive candidate for solving a wide range of problems in complex photonics applications, and can be used throughout the experimental system from hologram design optimization, through filtrating of measurement data, expert and assistance systems to augmentation of experiments on real-time measurement evaluation.

    Tutor: Čižmár Tomáš, prof. Mgr., Ph.D.

  5. Correlation of X-ray computed tomography with microscopic techniques for material characterization

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an important method for 3D non-destructive imaging of samples in many fields. It is commonly used in industry for defect detection and quality control, scientific projects utilise imaging and quantification of data and apply a number of analyses to determine morphological and physical parameters. To put CT data in context with other methods, they often have to be supplemented with established imaging methods such as electron and light microscopy and qualitative techniques such as X-ray spectroscopy. The data from each technique typically have a different format, size, resolution, etc. Combining such different information about samples is a challenge. When correlating two different 3D datasets, it is necessary to ensure that the sample structures correspond to each other. For a combination of 2D and 3D techniques, a corresponding 2D section has to be found in the 3D dataset. This requires a programming approach or a use of special software. The work will deal with techniques of correlation of information from various imaging methods. Such a multidisciplinary approach is in high demand today and has a big potential.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  6. Cryogenic electron microscopy and microfluidics

    The use of low temperatures during preparation and subsequent analysis of sensitive materials are very relevant topic in research because they enable the study of hydrated and electron-beam sensitive systems in high resolution. The use of microfluid chips, which are compatible with various imaging and analytical techniques, carries strong applied potential either in biological or chemical sciences. The thesis should mainly deal with instrumental development heading to the adaptation of current devices for operation at low temperatures and applications using these new technologies for imaging and analysis of e.g. microbial strains or new biopolymers, which are currently subject of several research projects. The candidate will develop/modify low-temperature assemblies for electron microscope, take part in measurements and also in adaptation of software for acquisition and image processing. The project will take place at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI) of the Czech Academy of Sciences with possibilities of partial/full employment. PhD student will participate at several TAČR and GAČR projects, which are currently being solved at ISI.

    Tutor: Krzyžánek Vladislav, Ing., Ph.D.

  7. Development of advanced optical layers for power lasers

    The dissertation thesis will deal with the development of advanced optical layers for power lasers. This development will be carried out in cooperation with Meopta company. The work will deal with the controlled destruction of layers by a power laser and subsequent analysis by methods available in CEITEC nano (especially SIMS and TEM). This development is funded by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic until the end of 2023. The aim of the development is to measure the Laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of existing optic layers manufactured by Meopta and at the same time to improve LIDT of these layers. The work can also deal with simulations of laser destruction using LUMERICAL program.

    Tutor: Průša Stanislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  8. Dimensionality reduction of spectroscopic data

    The amount of data obtained in one experiment is steadily increasing. Contemporary state-of-the-art Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system provide bulky data sets with millions of objects (spectra) and thousands of variables (wavelengths). Thus, there is a must driven by more efficient data storage, handling and processing; this might be tackled by lowering the dimension of raw data sets. This demands to truncate the information and omit redundancy and noise. In this work, advanced mathematical algorithms will be investigated, with special attention to non-linear algorithms. The main parameter is robustness of the algorithm. Outcomes of this thesis will be directly applied to data processing in various applications, including the multivariate mapping of sample surface.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  9. Electron tweezers and development of new applications

    The dissertation will deal with the development of electron tweezers, which allows to move droplets of eutectic liquids on the surface of semiconductors. The electron tweezers utilize the focused electron beam and is already tested in the UHV-SEM microscope, developed in cooperation with TESCAN company. During the controlled movement, the gold-containing droplet can for example etch or otherwise modify the surface of semiconductors (germanium, silicon). The dissertation thesis should focus on the interaction of different eutectic droplets with various substrates including 2D materials (graphene, etc.). Part of this work will be optimization of this process including its real-time monitoring using UHV-SEM microscope.

    Tutor: Průša Stanislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  10. Hyperspectral camera with high spatial and spectral resolution.

    Current hyperspectral imaging techniques do not reach the spectral resolution and wavelength sufficient for element or molecule analysis. A system of such properties is particularly needed for a comprehensive analysis of the metabolite, pigment or other substances contained in the observed object. The aim of this work is to use a progressive nano-technology and design approaches to construct a compact hyperspectral system with high image and spatial resolution working in a wide range of wavelengths. The motivation of this work is to increase the potential of this non-destructive imaging technique for routine analysis of plant growth and algal cultures. The work will also include the necessary physical and technical background design of advanced optical systems and photonic elements, which are a prerequisite for the construction of progressive optical and spectroscopic systems. The result of this work will be a compact device for measuring hyperspectral data.

    Tutor: Šerý Mojmír, Ing., Ph.D.

  11. Incoherent holographic microscopy in personalised treatment of cancer

    Cancer invasion and metastasis is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. The main problems lie in accuracy of diagnosis and the choice of the most efficient treatment. Better utilisation of biopsy material is a promising candidate for improvement. This project focuses on development of a new procedure where the biopsy fragments from cancer patients will be subjected to time-lapse analysis of 3D cell motility based on incoherent holographic imaging featuring quantitative cell mass imaging and to some extent penetration into the depth of the tumor tissue. Motile behaviour of cells within the fragments will be quantitative analysed and statistical significance of changes induced by presence of potential chemotherapeutic agents will be evaluated thus indicating a suitable treatment for the relevant patients.

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  12. In-situ monitoring of nanostructures growth

    Revealing the growth mechanisms at nanoscale is particularly challenging from many reasons. The most prominent advances in physics of nanostructure growth were achieved utilizing real-time in-situ monitoring techniques (both microscopic and spectroscopic). In our group, we have a large expertise in real time electron microscopy and, in the following year, we will install a new vacuum chamber dedicated to Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to work on revealing puzzling growth modes of different nanostructures of interest (semiconductor nanowires grown by MBE, metallic/oxide threedimensional nanostructures formed by Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition etc.) utilizing state-of-the-art equipment. Close collaboration with ThermoFisher Scientific R&D labs will be part of applicants work.

    Tutor: Kolíbal Miroslav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  13. In-situ monitoring of 2D nanostructures growth using LEEM

    Revealing the growth mechanisms at nanoscale is particularly challenging from many reasons. The most prominent advances in physics of nanostructure growth were achieved utilizing real-time in-situ monitoring techniques (both microscopic and spectroscopic). In our group, we have a large expertise in real time electron microscopy and, this year, a new vacuum chamber dedicated to Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy was installed to CEITEC Nano infractructure. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to work on revealing puzzling growth modes of twodimensional nanostructures of interest (silicene, phosphorene, transition metal selenides etc.) utilizing state-of-the-art equipment.

    Tutor: Kolíbal Miroslav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  14. Investigation of spatial and temporal development of laser-induced plasmas

    Laser ablation of matter is an essential process involved in the chemical analysis using various techniques of analytical chemistry. The spectroscopic investigation of characteristic plasma emission provides qualitative and quantitative information about the sample of interest. Standard analysis is based on the processing of emission signal; the process of laser ablation and consecutive development of laser-induced plasma is marginal and of little analytical interest. But, understanding the complexity of laser-matter interaction is a crucial step in the improvement of the latter data processing approaches. Thus, this work will target the investigation of spatial and temporal development of laser-induced plasmas, imaging of plasma plumes and determination of their thermodynamic properties. Outcomes of this work will be used in further advancement of the ablation of various materials (incl. biological tissues), improvement of optomechanical instrumentation (collection optics) and optimization of signal standardization.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  15. Kinetics of growth and phase transformations in self-assembled molecular systems

    Self-assembly is a promising route to fabricate nanostructures with atomic precision. Targeted design of molecular precursors allows to program nanostructures with desired functional properties. To implement these structures into functional devices it is necessary to understand the kinetics of the grow as it defines the fabrication procedures. However, only little is known about kinetics of the growth/transformation processes near thermodynamic limit. The goal of Ph.D. study is to study the growth kinetics and phase transformation in self-assembled molecular systems and formulate suitable model describing the surface processes. The experimental research within the PhD study aims at the understanding the kinetics deposition/self-assembly phenomena of organic molecular compounds on metallic surfaces. Low-Energy Electron Microscopy presents an ideal technique for monitoring real time evolution of surface growth in both real and reciprocal space. These data will be complemented with chemical composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic level structure by scanning tunneling microscopy available within the UHV system.

    Tutor: Čechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  16. Mapping plasmonic modes

    Localized surface plasmons (LSP) generated in metal nanoparticles (plasmonic antennas) can exhibit various modes differing in energy, charge distribution (dipoles vs. multipoles) and radiation capability (bright and dark modes). One of the most effective methods enabling generation and characterization - mapping of these modes at the single antenna level is Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) provided by High-resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM). The PhD study will be aimed at application of HR STEM-EELS for mapping the modes of LSP in plasmonic antennas. The emphasis will be especially put at a study of hybridized modes of coupled antenna structures and/or strong coupling effects between modes in plasmonic antennas and excitations in their surrounding environments. These excitations will be polaritons in quantum nanodots localized nearby antennas (the visible range) and/or phonons in absorbing antenna substrate membranes (IR – mid IR). In the former case, the experiment will be carried out by HR STEM-EELS at CEITEC Nano infrastructure (Titan), in the latter case, by Nion Ultra STEM available at some laboratories abroad (e.g. Oak Ridge national laboratory).

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  17. Microscopy with geometric-phase optical elements

    Geometric-phase optical elements are a new tool for complex light shaping and generation of special states of light. Unlike traditional refractive elements, the geometric-phase elements control the light using transformation of its polarization state. Thanks to technology of liquid crystals or principles of plasmonics, geometric-phase elements provide abrupt phase changes on physically thin substrates. Compact size and unique polarization properties make them ideal candidates for simply integrable spatial light modulators. The dissertation thesis topic is to find and verify the potential of geometric-phase elements in common-path digital holography and advanced optical microscopy.

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  18. Multiphoton imaging in personalised treatment of cancer

    Cancer invasion and metastasis is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. The main problems lie in accuracy of diagnosis and the choice of the most efficient treatment. Better utilisation of biopsy material is a promising candidate for improvement. This project focuses on development of a new procedure where the biopsy fragments from cancer patients will be subjected to time-lapse analysis of 3D cell motility based on 2-photon imaging featuring deep penetration. Motile behaviour of cells within the fragments will be quantitative analysed and statistical significance of changes induced by presence of potential chemotherapeutic agents will be evaluated thus indicating a suitable treatment for the relevant patients.

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  19. New methods of control for holographic microscopy

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy is focused on the observation of living cells in vitro. Long-term observation of living cells necessarily requires automated control of both microscope and experiment. The first goal is to design a new optical arrangement of a fully automated microscope, its mechanical design, and creation of the control software. Another goal is to propose methods for automation of biological experiments, implementing them into control software, and testing in real experiments.

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  20. Novel effects in guided-wave nanophotonics structures

    The theoretical analysis of novel optical effects and functionalities in modern nanophotonic guided-wave structures is impossible without adequate and powerful numerical tools. The project will focus on development and application of such techniques that are based on eigemode expansion. Application will address selected interesting problems, such as, nanophotonics arrays that support the bound states in continuum, the issues related to the loss compensation in plasmonic structures, systems with gain and loss where realistic models of gain media based on the rate equations for the populations is used, and modulation in hybrid waveguides with graphene.

    Tutor: Petráček Jiří, prof. RNDr., Dr.

  21. Numerical processing methods of experimental data for imaging spectroscopic reflectometry within the framework of the optical characterization of thin solid films

    The content of the dissertation thesis is to find effective algorithms for numerical processing of big sets of experimental data obtained by means of imaging spectroscopic Reflectometer (built in The Coherence Optics Laboratory of IPE FME BUT) from non-uniform thin films for the determination of the optical parameters of these films. The goal is to realize aforementioned algorithms in the form of a software.

    Tutor: Ohlídal Miloslav, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  22. Optical levitation in vacuum

    Tightly focused laser beams can act as optical "tweezers" to trap and manipulate tiny objects, from nanoparticles to living cells. The development of this method has earned Arthur Ashkin Nobel prize in physics. Most experiments thus far have been carried out in air or liquid. Due to an increasing interest of quantum technologies, employing the optical tweezers to trap objects in ultra-high vacuum (see the figure) became one of the interesting goals of scientists around the world. Such an isolated particle behaves as a very weakly damped mechanical oscillator whose energy can be easily removed and thus “cooled” eventually to the quantum ground state. Moreover, optically trapped objects exhibit, not only, unprecedented sensing performance (they can sense very weak gravity, electric and magnetic forces), but can also be used to study fundamental processes of nanoscopic heat engines, or quantum phenomena involving large masses. The main goal of the proposed PhD thesis will be to study optomechanics of single and multiple nano-particles optically trapped in vacuum, shaping the optical potential and employ such an isolated object to act as ultra-sensitive sensor at various scenarios. For instance, object optically levitated near a substrate surface can act as an atomic force microscope (AFM) but with extremely high sensitivity (pN vs zN). The PhD student is expected to perform the experiments, analyzed and interpret the results. The Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS (www.isibrno.cz) will provide all material conditions for this work for 4 years, has 20 year history in optical micro-manipulation techniques, collaborates with a number of laboratories around the world and belongs to the leading world-wide players in the this area (http://www.isibrno.cz/cs/mikrofotonika).

    Tutor: Brzobohatý Oto, Mgr., Ph.D.

  23. Solid state surfaces and thin films studied by combination of Low Energy Ion Scattering with selected analytical and imagining methods

    Low Energy Ion Scattering is well known for its extreme surface sensitivity. Its application is essential when the topmost atomic layer determines behaviour of various functional systems (catalysis, initial states of oxidation, graphene based systems, magnetic films, etc.). The proposed topic offers an exploitation of LEIS surface sensitivity in combination with other analytical and imaging techniques like for instance XPS, SIMS, AFM, and STM for a study of selected systems.

    Tutor: Průša Stanislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  24. Spectroscopy with aluminum ions cooled by quantum logic

    The aim of the research will be a theoretical analysis of the principle of quantum logic of cooling of trapped aluminum ions in Paul's trap by means of a suitable cooling element, eg calcium ion. The frequency spectrum of the forbidden transition of the aluminum ion in the 267 nm band will be investigated, where long lifetimes of the forbidden transition can be expected. The core of the work will be the design, assembly and pilot operation of a vacuum experimental apparatus in which a Paul-type electric trap will be placed. The experimental set-up will contain a source of aluminum atoms and a source of calcium atoms. To obtain neutral atoms, heat oven will be used in the case of calcium atoms and, in the case of aluminum, laser ablation using a nanosecond laser. To obtain positively charged ions the method of ionization of atoms by optical pumping of appropriate transitions of neutral aluminum and calcium atoms will be used. The quantum logic of testing the quantum state of the aluminum ion by means of a calcium ion will be used for the spectroscopy measurements of the forbidden aluminum transition. Methods and procedure itself will be experimentally tested in the laboratories of the Department of Coherence Optics at the Institute of Scientific Instruments of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Brno. In particular, it will involve the use of a new ultra-low-noise optical frequency comb, which will allow the absolute measurement of the optical frequency value of the measuring laser in the region of 267 nm.

    Tutor: Číp Ondřej, Ing., Ph.D.

  25. Topological insulators studied by LEIS

    The Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) has proved its capability to study composition of the solid state surfaces. The extreme surface sensitivity of the technique is widely used in analysis of the elemental composition of a topmost atomic layer. The topological insulators are materials where the thin surface layer is conductive in two directions parallel to the surface plane while the bulk material remains insulating. These materials are very promising in the field of spintronics and quantum computation. Thus the surface termination plays the critical role in the definition of the topological insulator properties and can be effectively studied using LEIS in combination with selected analytical and imaging techniques (XPS, SIMS, SEM, AFM and STM). The state of art LEIS spectrometer (Qtac100, ION-TOF GmbH) is part of the complex UHV apparatus for deposition of thin films and modification of solid state surface at micro and nanotechnology laboratory of CEITEC BUT.

    Tutor: Průša Stanislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  26. Topological modes in photonics arrays and lattices

    Topology is the branch of mathematics concerned with quantities that are preserved under continuous deformations. The application of topology is revolutionizing photonics, bringing with it new theoretical discoveries and a wealth of potential applications. This field was inspired by the discovery of topological insulators, in which interfacial electrons transport without dissipation even in the presence of impurities. Similarly, we can design photonic lattices or coupled waveguide arrays supporting topologically protected states of light. According to the agreement, the work will focus on theoretical research of topological states in selected photonic structure, e.g., coupled nanoparticles or plasmonic waveguide arrays. The study assumes either the development of own methods or the use of commercial software (e.g. Lumerical, Comsol).

    Tutor: Petráček Jiří, prof. RNDr., Dr.

  27. Tunable metasurfaces

    Metasurfaces represent a new kind of promising nanophotonic devices providing new functionalities at their radical miniaturization. Thus, they are perspective for outperforming classical optical elements and devices. They consist of subwavelength nanoelements, either metallic or dielectric, which contribute to forming their overall optical properties by scattering-induced phase modification. PhD study will be aimed at exploring a new class of metasurfaces enabling tunability of their optical properties. This can be provided by application of nanoelements materials undergoing phase transformations, and/or by piezoelements. Metasurfaces will be fabricated by electron beam lithography and their functional properties characterized by holographic methods enabling wide-field quantitative phase imaging of fields shaped by them.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  28. Utilization of plasmonic nanostructures for local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields

    The study will be aimed at design, fabrication, and characterization of resonant plasmonic nano- and micro-structures (“diabolo” antennas, split ring resonators, etc.) providing a significant local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields. The structures with resonant properties particularly in the IR and THz will be studied, with respect to their potential applications in relevant spectroscopic methods.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  29. 2D materials for supercapacitors

    Supercapacitors (SCs) represent one of the most promising energy storage technologies because of their remarkable features, such as ultrahigh power density and ultralong cycling life. This PhD study aims at an exploration of 2D hybrids based on MXenes and black phosphorous (BP), as high-performance electrode materials for SCs. It will concentrate on (i) multi-scale characterization of 2D hybrids up to atomic resolution to provide fundamental knowledge underlying the interaction between the components of 2D hybrids, and on (ii) an in situ study of chemical stability and growth mechanisms of these materials. In the study, state-of-the-art characterisation methods available at CEITEC Nano core facility such as Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM), UHV STM/AFM, X-ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS), Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM), FT-IR Spectroscopy, and HR (S)TEM will be used. The collaboration with the Dresden University of Technology planned to synthesize the 2D materials will be held.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  30. 3D epitaxial printing of semiconductors using electron tweezers

    The dissertation thesis will deal with the development of 3D epitaxial printing using eutectic liquid droplets, which are moved by electron beam (electron tweezers) in the UHV-SEM microscope, developed in cooperation with TESCAN. During the movement, the gold-containing droplet is saturated with germanium (silicon) atoms, resulting in epitaxial deposition of the semiconductor at the droplet location. The movement of the droplet and thus also the "print" location of the semiconductor can be controlled programmatically. Part of the work will be optimization of this process including its real-time monitoring using UHV-SEM microscope.

    Tutor: Průša Stanislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.


Course structure diagram with ECTS credits

1. year of study, winter semester
AbbreviationTitleL.Cr.Com.Compl.Hod. rozsahGr.Op.
9AIVAb initio Calculations in Material Sciencescs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9MAVMathematics of Wave Opticscs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9ANCMicroscopy and Analysis Using Charged Particlescs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9NTCNanotechnologycs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9ONAOrganic Nanostructures at Inorganic Surfacescs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9RPTX-Ray Computed Tomographycs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9STHStructure of Mattercs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9SLPIntroduction to Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopycs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9MMMMultilevel Modelling of Materialscs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9VKBConcepts of Biofotonicscs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9VKNConcepts of Nanophotonicscs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9TPLConcepts in Solid State Theorycs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9ZDNImaging and Diagnostics of Nanostructurescs0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
1. year of study, summer semester
AbbreviationTitleL.Cr.Com.Compl.Hod. rozsahGr.Op.
9KTDThe Fourier Transform of Lattices and the Kinematical Theory of Difractioncs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9MPAMathematics for Applicationscs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9MIAAdvanced Light Microscopy - Imaging Theorycs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9PVPProgramming in Pythoncs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9RF1Equations of Mathematical Physics Ics, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
9MIKLight Microscopycs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes
1. year of study, both semester
AbbreviationTitleL.Cr.Com.Compl.Hod. rozsahGr.Op.
9AJEnglish for Doctoral Degree Studyen0CompulsoryDrExCj - 60yes
9ESMModelling of Thermodynamic Stability and Phase Transformationscs, en0RecommendedDrExP - 20yes