Detail oboru

Advanced nanotechnologies and microtechnologies

Original title in Czech: Pokročilé nanotechnologie a mikrotechnologieSTIAbbreviation: PNTMTAcad. year: 2017/2018Specialisation: -

Programme: Advanced Materials and Nanosciences

Length of Study: 4 years

Supervisor oboru

Issued topics of Doctoral Study Program

  1. High Frequency Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy

    The High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HFEPR) is very powerful method in investigation systems with large zero-field splittings (ZFS) such as, e.g. single molecule magnets (SMMs). In studies of coupled metallic centers with large ZFS (SMMs), HFEPR is an essential tool to provide detailed information about the magnetic properties of these materials. The PhD candidate will be trained in HFEPR spectroscopy investigation of SMMs, which are ideal candidates for high density data storage or for quantum computation. The experiments will be performed in frequency range of 100 - 1000 GHz, temperatures 1.6 – 300 K, and magnetic fields up to 18 T. The candidate should be highly-motivated, team player as well as to have MSc degree in engineering or natural science. The project is supported by the prestigious European Research Council (ERC) grant and for more details do not hesitate to contact Petr Neugebauer directly.

    Tutor: Neugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.

  2. A role of metallothionein isoforms in chemoresistance of cancer cells to platinum cytostatics.

    The main objective of thesis is a study of expression of metallothionein isoforms within the cells of malignant neuroblastoma and prostate carcinoma on mRNA level (qRT-PCR), and also the protein level (immunoblotting). The obtained results will be correlated with a susceptibility of cancer cells against chosen coordination complexes of platinum (cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin). The most important isoforms will be cloned into expression plasmids and transfected into cells with the aim to increase their expression and to study the effects on chemoresistance. To decrease the expression RNA interference will be used. Obtained data will be exploited for a design of nanometric vehicle with capability of co-transporting the platinum cytostatic and siRNA interfering with expression of selected isoforms into the cancer cells. The results will provide further insight into the complex role of metallothioneins in chemoresistance of cancer cells against the platinum cytostatics, which is an often effector decreasing their therapeutic index, and thus also the efficacy of treatment.

    Tutor: Adam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  3. Advanced laser ablation based analytical techniques for high resolutin mapping

    For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  4. Advanced methods of imaging by coherence-controlled holographic microscope

    The topic is focused on research in the field of numerical image reconstruction in coherence-controlled holographic microscope. The work will aim at achievement of the best resolution of the microscope and at detailed investigation of possibilities of imaging 3D objects. We assume to utilize the discrimination properties of low-coherence light (“coherence gate”), the methods of a complex-field deconvolution, and numerical refocusing methods. The work will be directed especially to biological samples imaging. Requirements: - knowledge in field of optics corresponding to undergraduate courses - basic ability to write computer code, preferably in Matlab

    Tutor: Chmelík Radim, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  5. Analysis using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method in vacuum

    Scope of the thesis: The aim of this dissertation thesis is the detection of elements with significant spectral lines in VUV region, such as C, N, S, P, Cl, and Br. This thesis will include necessary development and construction of detection system (including spectrometer and detector) designed for LIBS analysis with spectral range under 170 nm and resolution < 0.2 nm. It is desired that this detection system will be a modular extension of already developed LIBS interaction chamber, developed at CEITEC BUT. Consecutively, this system will be tested. Objectives: A. Literature research of current state of the art with respect to thesis goals. B. Design of the spectrometer and detection unit. C. Construction of the detection system. D. Analysis in vacuum. E. Estimation of detection limits for selected elements.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  6. Biophysical study of living cells

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to study adhesion force between nanostructured surface and living cells. The student will set up a system of nanostructured pillars (substrates with those patterns are already available for the student) with desired surface properties. It is expected that the cells will attached to the top of the pillars and due to adhesion forces the cells will deform the pillars’ shapes. The student will capture a real-time video of the structure using either confocal or holographic microscope. The video will be processed by a script in MATLAB environment to create a real-time video of the adhesion force between the cell and the pillars. PhD candidate will work together with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO).

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  7. Catalytic growth of selected III-V semiconductor nanowires

    The study will be aimed at the growth of III-Sb and III-As nanowires utilizing various catalyst nanoparticles in a MBE chamber of the complex UHV system in the CEITEC Nano research infrastructure. Characterization of morphology, composition, and structure, as well as measurement of their optical and electrical transport properties will serve as tools for monitoring the quality of nanowires.

    Tutor: Kolíbal Miroslav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9 system to study of secondary metabolism of unicellular algae

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate of secondary metabolism of unicellular algae using genome editing based on Crispr/Cas9 technology. The main goal will be the construction of knockout generation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain in genes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Subsequently, use the ambient mass spectrometry under ambient conditions with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and direct analysis in real time (DART) to study metabolome in the obtained strains.

    Tutor: Adam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  9. Description of the slow crack growth in polymer materials

    Due to increase of the long term application of the polymer materials process of slow stable crack growth became important scientific topic. Therefore, the general goal of the work lies in the accurate description of the slow crack propagation in the case of polymeric structure under complex loading conditions taking into account residual stresses. Slow crack growth can be described by the corresponding fracture mechanics parameters and plays an important part in estimation of this lifetime. Numerical model will be validated by correlation with experimental data of PCCL Leoben and Polymer Institute Brno.

    Tutor: Hutař Pavel, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  10. Development and application of eucaryotic cell-based microcolumn separation techniques.

    The thesis will focus on development of new generation of electromigration capillary separation techniques by designing, preparation and testing of novel smart interactive phases for capillary electrophoresis or capillary electrochromatography. The designed phases will be based on living cells able to selectively transform target analyte from the complex sample to a detectable product. Manufacturing phase will be based on genetic modification technology enabling not only tailor the cell receptors towards the target analyte (to be extracted from the sample and internalized into the cell) but also modify the cellular pathway for transformation of the analyte into the product and its release back into the capillary flow.

    Tutor: Adam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  11. Development of a device and methodology for Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that utilizes high power-densities obtained by focusing the radiation from a pulsed laser to generate a luminous micro-plasma from an analyte in the focal region. The micro-plasma emission is subsequently analyzed by a spectrometer. The plasma composition is representative to the analyte's elemental composition. The topics of the dissertation work include the application of LIBS and its modifications for high-resolution elemental mapping of solid samples.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  12. Development of a Novel Terahertz Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Spin Dynamics Investigations

    The topic of this PhD work is focused on development of a novel THz magnetic resonance spectroscopical method to investigate electron spin dynamics of bulk and surface materials. Today, electron spin dynamics at frequencies above 100 GHz is largely unknown, which limits progress in many domains. Particularly in quantum computation at THz frequencies and fast growing hyperpolarization methods in NMR, such as Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP); where in both cases the electron spin dynamics (relaxation) of the system is essential. In this PhD project, which is supported by the prestigious European Research Council (ERC) grant, we are going to design and build a new THz spectrometer. It will provide access to spin dynamics in frequency range of 100 - 1000 GHz, temperatures 1.6 – 300 K, and magnetic fields up to 18 T. The PhD candidate should have MSc degree in engineering or natural science, be highly-motivated and able to work in an international team. For more details do not hesitate to contact Petr Neugebauer directly.

    Tutor: Neugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.

  13. Development of advanced galvanic plastic metallization technology

    The doctoral thesis is focused on research, development and production of new and perspective electrochemical based metal-plated plastic technologies. Physical and materials properties of metal-plated plastics will be also studied in detail. The aim of this work is to design a new technology accented to fast, easily reproducible and environmentally friendly preparation of metallic-plated surfaces excluding the currently widely used ecologically unacceptable hexavalent chromium in the preparation process. The work focuses in detail on the individual steps of the surface conditioning, i.e. cleaning, pickling, etching, optimal suspensions production, and process of electrolytic deposition of the surface layer. Attention will be given to the mechanical resistance of metallic-plated surface, their physical characteristics, and study of their microstructures. Conventional available methods used in the field of material and physical engineering will be used to study and evaluate the materials within the frame of this work produced metal-plated plastic.

    Tutor: Klakurková Lenka, Ing., Ph.D.

  14. Development of incoherent holographic microscopy and related techniques

    For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

    Tutor: Kolman Pavel, Ing., Ph.D.

  15. Development of unconventional casting technology of magnesium alloy castings produced by precision casting

    The doctoral thesis is focused on research and development of unconventional casting technology of high-quality lightweight, tough and ductile magnesium alloy castings for transport industry in order to achieve quality and parameters comparable to the world leading manufacturers. The aim of this work is development and modification of casting technology for magnesium alloy castings manufactured by investment casting technology to ceramic shell with controlled solidification by progressive cooling methods, including the study of physical and material properties depending on casting conditions. Conventional methods used in the field of material and physical engineering, which are available, will be used to study and evaluate in the frame of this work produced magnesium alloy castings.

    Tutor: Juliš Martin, Ing., Ph.D.

  16. Digital PCR development

    Student will learn the principal of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its digital variant (dPCR) including its advantages and properties. Student will then design and fabricate a silicon chip to conduct dPCR using division of original sample to least 106 samples. Student has generally two major tasks: setting up the system to conduct the dPCR and also demonstrate it power to identify presence of rare DNA with background of another one with concentration at least 105 higher. Student will then propose a system for portable version of dPCR.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  17. Direct ink writing for fabrication of biological-tissue-like-constructs

    This PhD research topic explores Direct Ink Writing method, also known as robocoasting, for in vitro fabrication of tissue-like-constructs with potential application as i) tissue or organ substitutes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches or ii) development of models for in vitro testing of drugs and new therapies. Direct ink writing is an additive manufacturing method able to produce polymeric, ceramic or metallic shapes, besides, it offer the possibility to use cell-loaded materials to fabricate directly cell-containing constructs. Along the studies, the candidate will have the opportunity to learn and work from the synthesis of the materials for manufacturing, to the biological characterization of the manufactured constructs. Principal attention will devote to fabrication of bone-like tissues, but according with the results, other tissues such as pancreas, muscle or neuronal will be addressed. Highly motivated and collaborative candidates with outstanding track of records and with the ambition to learn from both materials and biological sciences are welcome to submit an application.

    Tutor: Montufar Jimenez Edgar Benjamin, Ing., Ph.D.

  18. Electrochemical detection of protein biomarkers with microfluidic chip

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to perform theoretical study, design, fabrication and characterization of gold electrochemical sensors (EC) made by planar technology in combination with pulse electrochemical method, such as lock-in amplification. PhD candidate will perform detail analysis of electrode behavior and optimize their geometry. Besides that the student will design and fabricate a microfluidic system, which will allow to define the flow of liquid between individual electrochemical sensors. The lock-in amplification technique allows concurrently interrogate a few sensors. Basic characteristic will be perform using model Fe2+/Fe3+ system and compare with standard cyclic voltammetry. PhD candidate will then perform specific reaction antibody/antigen at the gold surface after the surface is treated with a thiol cross linker that there will be different antibody at each EC cell. PhD candidate will work together either with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO) or with partner group at Mendel University. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  19. Enhancement of laser-induced plasma signal using nanoparticles

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method provides real-time qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of samples without any prior preparation. However, deposition of nanoparticles in the interaction region on the sample surface leads to significant improvement of sensitivity, i.e. limits of detection. Such novel approach is known as Nanoparticles Enhanced LIBS (abbreviated as NELIBS) and its utilization is getting popular in LIBS community. Yet still, mechanism of signal enhancement is not satisfactorily explained. Preliminary experiments are in agreement with theory of surface plasmons generated by the impact of laser beam with the presence of nanoparticles. Thus, primary objective of this dissertation thesis will be the study and explanation of the enhancement effect in NELIBS experiment.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  20. Experimental investigation of anomalous slip in non-magnetic bcc metals

    Body-centered cubic metals of the VB and VIB groups are technologically important materials, yet the mechanisms that govern their plastic deformation are still unclear. All non-magnetic bcc metals exhibit the so-called anomalous slip on one of the low-stressed {110}<111> systems in compression, which can be reconciled using the recent computational studies of screw dislocations. However, in the VB group of metals the anomalous slip takes place also under tension, which cannot be explained even using the most sophisticated computational models. The purpose of this study is to investigate the origin of anomalous slip by performing tension and compression experiments on millimeter-sized samples of single-crystals of bcc Ta and W. The orientation of the sample will be determined by EBSD and the character of plastic deformation studied using the differential interference contrast in high-resolution optical microscope. The observed slip activity will be compared with the prediction of the existing effective yield criteria and will serve to make these criteria more accurate.

    Tutor: Gröger Roman, doc. Ing., Ph.D. et Ph.D.

  21. Experimental study and modeling of prismatic dislocation loops

    The prismatic dislocation loops have Burgers vector perpendicular to the loop plane and they are created by irradiation or by plastic deformation. These loops can be easily seen in transmission electron microscope (TEM) and can be produced by Ga+ ions in focused ion beam (FIB). The objective of this project is to study interactions of small prismatic loops with each other and with free surfaces of the TEM foil both experimentally and by atomistic modeling using empirical potentials.

    Tutor: Fikar Jan, Mgr., Ph.D.

  22. Externally controllable organic quantum bits

    The combination of graphene and single molecular magnets offers the opportunity of external tuning of magnetic properties of deposited organic magnets. The research within the Ph.D. study aims at the understanding of deposition/self-assembly phenomena of organic compounds containing magnetic atoms on graphene surfaces. The graphene surface offers the interesting possibility to alter the functional properties of prepared nanostructures by external means, i.e., the gate voltage. (For detailed info please contact the supervisor.)

    Tutor: Čechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  23. Fabrication of nanostructured valve metal (Ta, Al, etc.) layers, using porous-anodic-alumina template. Examination of the electrical properties with focus on capacitive and memristive behavior.

    Fabrication of nanostructured valve metals (Ta,Al,Nb,Ti,) and ultrathin metal oxides is of vast importance for development of next generation electronic components, especially DRAM and emerging non-volatile memory micro- and nanodevices (memristors). In the doctoral study we will intend to develop electrochemistry-based formation conception, to determine the growth mechanisms and explore physical, chemical, electrical and dielectric properties of self-organized arrays of nanostructured refractory metals (nanocolumns and nanotubes) synthesized via electrodeposition from non-aqueous solutions (ionic liquids) through nanopores in anodic-alumina thin films grown directly over the metal and mixed-metal substrates. Diverse nanostructured functional interfaces such as metal/insulator or metal/semiconductor, with and without top metallic electrodes, will be created and characterized towards potential applications in advanced electronic devices. The electrochemical deposition as the main deposition technique might be complemented with other proceedures for metals deposition, such as PVD and CVD, especially if the liquid electrochemical approach might lead to non-reproducible structure properties. The electrical properties will be determined by means of C/V, I/V and chronoamperomenty measurements. Necessary structural and compositional analyses will be performed as well.

    Tutor: Šimůnková Helena, Dr.techn. Ing.

  24. Gecko mimicking structures

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The project focuses on a development of a nanostructured materials for gecko mimicking surfaces. The key part of the work is to conduct finite element modelling (FEM) of the desired structure and to fabricate it primarily at CEITEC facility, as well as at National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, USA. Next the surface of the structure has to be treated to get desirable surface properties by self-assembly monolayer and characterize it using force spectrum (force-distance measurement) by atomic force microscope. Creation of a system to demonstrate utilization of the adhesion force is highly desirable. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  25. Charge carriers transport and noise in carbon nanoparticles based supercapacitors

    The goal is to propose the methodology for the supercapacitor lifetime prediction with respect to the attainment of 10 years life time guarantee required for the applications in the satellite systems. The methodology should be based on: 1) Analysis of the charge transport and the dependence of capacitance on the bias voltage or frequency, respectively, for capacitors of capacitance 1 to 100 F. 2) Analysis of time dependences for the charging of capacitors with constant current or constant voltage, respectively. 3) Supercapacitor’s self-discharge analysis. 4) Measurement of capacitance of Helmholtz layer and diffuse layer.

    Tutor: Sedláková Vlasta, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  26. Charge transport and its fluctuation at electrode/electrolyte interface

    Due to stochastic nature of the matter, physical processes in materials are considered to be stochastic, and they reveal as fluctuation of measurable quantities macroscopically. Not only in sensorsics, these fluctuations are usually called noise, since they are assumed to be unwanted and distracting components, which do not carry any information. The aim is study of chargé transport and fluctuation mechanisms at electrode/electrolyte interface. Practical results lay in development of physical and electrical models on the basis of experimental study of amperometric gas sensors.

    Tutor: Sedlák Petr, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  27. IR spectroscopy by plasmonic nanostructures

    In the study plasmonice nanostructures of novel materials (for instance graphene) for detection of adsorbed complex (bio)molecules by FT IR spectroscopy will be used. Instead of relying on classical spectral shifts of localized surtface plasmon polaritons, the „finger prints“ of the molecules in optical spectra enhanced by plasmonic effects will be detected. Here, particularly, tunability of plasmon resonance properties of the nanostructures will be utilized.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  28. Label-free detection of protein biomarkers using ultrathin silicon sensors

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The goal of this work is to perform theoretical study, design, fabrication and characterization of nanosheet sensors made by an advanced planar technology in combination with pulse method, such as lock-in amplification. Goal of this work is to study, characterize and optimize an array of sensors made from ultrathin single crystal silicon (chips have been fabricated and they are available). This silicon device with thickness of 10.5 nm can be used as resistive sensor connected as van den Pauw device or as Hall sensor to detect intensity of magnetic field. Change of charge at its surface will modulate its conductivity or magnetic particle its properties as Hall sensor. The device will be powered by a current pulses and the output will be process by a lock-in amplifier. PhD candidate will identify the system signal noise ratio and limit of detection (LOD) of the biosubstances of interest. He/she will also design and fabricate a simple microfluidic system to confine the tested sample at suitable location at the chip. There is also required to optimize the buffer solutions not to affect the measurement. PhD candidate will analyze the type of silane crosslinkers and their utilization using chemical vapor deposition technique. Basic properties will be conducted using albumin. Next the PhD candidate will perform specific reaction antibody - antigen of one biomarker and determines its LOD. PhD candidate will work together either with Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO) as they have cancer’s biomarkers or with partner group at Mendel University. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  29. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in clinical research

    Imaging techniques provide solid analytical platform also in clinical research where development and degradation of organs and soft tissues is studied. Recently, utilization of other complementary techniques are getting bigger attention. Among them, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique offers beneficial alternative for its advantages, such as real-time qualitative and quantitative multi-elemental analysis of samples under investigation. Exploiting LIBS, mapping elemental distribution on the sample surface is provided. Those results extend imaging outcomes with additional information and deepens the understanding of physical and chemical processes involved in development/degradation of soft tissues under influence of various parameters (toxicity, lack of nutrients, malignant tumours). In this dissertation thesis will be addressed further development of LIBS device (improving spatial resolution) and methodology optimization (reproducible analysis of soft tissues).

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  30. Live-cell dry-mass profiling in cancer treatment

    Application of coherence controlled holographic microscopy and interferometry for measurements of dry-mass distributions in live cancer cells in tissue culture. Quantitative evaluation of statistically significant cellular responses to chemotherapeutical drugs using dynamic morphometric parameters derived by image processing. The project will include developments in primary tissue culture, microscopy, and image processing and data analysis.

    Tutor: Zicha Daniel, Ing., CSc.

  31. Lowering the detection limits of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique via innovative approaches

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique that utilizes high power-densities obtained by focusing the radiation from a pulsed laser to generate a luminous micro-plasma from an analyte in the focal region. The micro-plasma emission is subsequently analyzed by a spectrometer. The plasma composition is representative to the analyte's elemental composition. The topics of the dissertation work include the application of LIBS and its modifications for high-resolution elemental mapping of solid samples.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  32. Magneto Optical Studies of Solid States Materials

    High Frequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (HFEPR) is a magneto-optical method where microwave frequencies, typically 100s of GHz (meV range), are used as excitation. The HFEPR method is a powerful tool to investigate samples ranging from biomolecules, over metal centers to magnetic materials. In materials science, it is also widely applied for measurements of modern solid state materials like graphene, topological insulators etc. In this PhD project, the experiments will be performed in frequency range of 100 - 1000 GHz, temperatures 1.6 – 300 K, and magnetic fields up to 18 T. The project (supported by the prestigious European Research Council (ERC) grant) aims at detailed understanding of the low-energy electronic structure and Fermi surface in selected 2D and bulk materials. The PhD candidate should have MSc degree in engineering or natural science, be highly-motivated and able to work in an international team. For more details do not hesitate to contact Petr Neugebauer directly.

    Tutor: Neugebauer Petr, Ing., Ph.D.

  33. Mechanisms of grain boundary migration in functional metallic materials

    Mobility of grain boundaries has effect on properties of different types of materials. For instance, due to small grain size, nanostructured materials have large number of interfaces in comparison to other materials. Significant amount of internal interfaces leads to special properties of such materials. For instance, nanostructured materials can reveal improved strength or ductility. The functionality and stability of nanostructured materials are strongly dependent on the mobility of internal interfaces. The purpose of this project is to investigate the atomistic mechanisms of migration of interfaces using computer modelling and experimental validation of results.

    Tutor: Ostapovets Andriy, Ph.D., Mgr.

  34. Metallization of technical plastics for lightweight traffic components with reduced fuel consumption.

    The increased use of polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) based composites for aircraft structures has highlighted the need for reliable methods of bonding these materials to metallic components to enhance their wear and erosion resistance and also protect against lightning. In the doctoral study, surface treatments will be employed to enhance surface energy and alter surface chemistry to provide better long-term durability of the adhesive bonds between the polymer construction material (e.g. PEEK or CFRP - carbon fibre reinforced plastics) and a metal coating on its surface. Chemical reduction of nickel will be done to get the very first conductive layer upon the plastic material. However, the nickel reduction depends upon the direct attachment of a palladium-based catalyst to the substrate. Therefore, plasma treatement using diverse gases will be applied. Surface characterisation will be carried out to optimise these treatments. Surface energy and wettability will be examined using contact angle analysis, surface roughness will be examined using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) will be employed to study the surface chemistry. Bond strengths will be determined using available adhesion tests (peel-off, pull-out tests). Roughening of the plastic surface using diverse procedures might be examine as well.

    Tutor: Hubálek Jaromír, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  35. Modeling of functional properties of nanostructures for plasmonics

    For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

    Tutor: Kalousek Radek, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  36. Monitoring of cell energy balance and mapping of cells’ internal temperature distribution

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno, in collaboration with Institute of Biotechnology (IBT), Prague, Czech Republic. The project focuses on a development of a method to seed cells inside a calorimeter with an internal volume of ≈ 100 fl under an objective lens of a high power optical microscope. A considerable part of the project involves development of special methodology to grow cells in a calorimeter. The method will then be applied to monitor cellular energetic balance with respect to cell life cycle, such as mitosis, induction of apoptosis etc. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC, with a minor involvement of the IBT; part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  37. Monitoring of oxide surfaces by electron microscopies and spectroscopies

    Oxides form the basic component of many functional systems, e.g., catalysts. The model oxide surface can be prepared using pulsed laser deposition and analyzed in-situ. Within the Ph.D. study, the electron microscopies (SEM, LEEM) and electron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS, AR-PES, AES) will be used to determine properties of complex oxide surfaces and to monitor the evolution of the systems comprising metal atoms, organic molecules and nanoparticles on oxide surface. (For detailed info please contact the supervisor.)

    Tutor: Čechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  38. Nanocarbon based materials for detection or binding of heavy metals

    The work will be based on preparation, modification and characterization of different nanocarbon materials (graphene, graphene oxide, MWCNT). Prepared nanocarbons will be tested either for their utilization in working electrodes or biosensors or as materials for removal of heavy metals from contaminated waters.

    Tutor: Kopel Pavel, doc. RNDr., Ph.D.

  39. Nanoelectronic devices with novel magnetic and electric transport properties

    For more details please contact the supervisor.

    Tutor: Spousta Jiří, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  40. Nanomaterials for IR detection

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. The project focuses on a development of nanostructured materials integrated with MEMS bolometers for detection of radiation in IR and THz range. Key problem to be solved by the PhD candidate is deposition (growing) of the nanostructured materials at the chip at room temperature. As far we tested method with differential heating using dissipated Joule heat which seems to be promising. The PhD candidate will continue in this work and also should develop a technique suitable to deposit this materials at entire focal plane imaging system. The PhD candidate will optimize the deposition method and characterize the material using nondestructive techniques such as FTIR. Finally the PhD candidate will test the IR and THz response of the bolometer integrated with nanostructured material. The characterization in IR spectrum will be conducted at CEITEC, characterization in THz at Naval Graduate School, Monterey, California, USA.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  41. Plasmon enhanced photoluminiscence

    In this study plasmonic resonant nano-and micro-structures (particles, antennas, tips) will be used for enhancement of photoluminescence of nanostructures such as nanodots, nanowires and 2D materials (e.g. metal dichalcogenides: MoS2, WS2,....). In this way single photon sources provided by defects of these structures might be recognized.

    Tutor: Dub Petr, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  42. Properties study and technology of capacitor on a chip preparation using deep structures and high-k materials

    So-called "dry" electrolytic tantalum and niobium capacitors are commonly produced in discrete form. Their structure is described as a MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor). They have the advantage of high capacity and electrolyte-free construction. MOS capacitors commonly implemented in silicon CMOS technology are MIS as well as, but on the contrary very low capacity. The aim is to use MEMS technology to create deep, also 3D structures and subsequent conformal deposition of thin dielectric films, studying the effects of stress, behaviour of MIS structure, level of tunnelling currents and their dependence on the materials used. Work will partly take place in cooperation with the Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems at the TU Wien.

    Tutor: Hubálek Jaromír, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  43. Quantitative computed tomography

    Nondestructive imaging of internal structures of scanned object using x-ray computed tomography (CT) allows to acquire information characterizing absorption (local attenuation coefficients) which depends on material density. The attenuation of X-ray radiation when passing an object is defined by Beer-Lambert law. According to theory obtained CT data accurately characterize structure and inner composition of the object. In practice the accuracy and the reproducibility of CT measurement using laboratory devices is difficult to achieve. Quality of output data is negatively affected by several types of artifacts e.g. beam hardening and scatter and also by technical and mechanical limitations of acquiring process. An achievement of quantitative information from CT data requires development of data preprocessing algorithms for tomographic reconstruction and post processing on tomographic slices.

    Tutor: Kaiser Jozef, prof. Ing., Ph.D.

  44. Rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

    The topic is focused on development of numerical methods for rigorous simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in arbitrary inhomogeneous media. Namely, we assume investigation of the techniques based on the expansion into plane waves and/or eigenmodes in combination with perturbation techniques. Developed techniques will applied to modeling of light scattering by selected biological samples. Requirements: - knowledge in fields of electrodynamics and optics corresponding to undergraduate courses - basic ability to write computer code, preferably in Matlab.

    Tutor: Petráček Jiří, prof. RNDr., Dr.

  45. RTS noise in nanoelectronic structures

    The aim of this project is to determine parameters of traps in insulation layer of HFET/HEMT structures by analysis of its noise characteristics, mainly RTS (random telegraph signal) noise. Experimental work is based on measurement of temperature dependence of noise using helium cryostat and study of amplitude and mean time of capture and emission as a function of electric field intensity and charge carrier concentration in channel. These results will be used to improve generation-recombination model of noise origin and localization of traps.

    Tutor: Pavelka Jan, doc. Mgr., CSc. Ph.D.

  46. Scanning probe microscopy based tomography

    Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques (SPM) and particularly Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) are most common techniques for surface topography measurements. They have however still some limitations, for example its limited scanning range and lack of techniques for sub-surface mapping. Even if the interaction between probe and sample is already including information from sample volume, typically only surface topography or surface related physical properties are evaluated and the sub-surface information is lost. In most of the scanning regimes the amount of recorded and stored data is even so small that the information about sample volume is lost. On the other hand, there is lack of reliable subsurface mapping techniques with high resolution suitable for the growing field of nanotechnology, and methods of SPM tomography have large potential – and we can already see some first attempts for sub-surface mapping in the scientific literature. Aim of the proposed work is to develop techniques for mapping volume sample composition using SPM, particularly based on AC Scanning Thermal Microscopy and conductive Atomic Force Microscopy. This includes development of special reference samples, methodology and software development for control of a special, large area, SPM. In cooperation with the research group also a numerical modeling of probe-sample interaction will be performed and methods for sub-surface reconstruction will be tested.

    Tutor: Klapetek Petr, Mgr., Ph.D., Ph.D.

  47. Significance of coherence-controlled holographic microscope for objective assessment of mixed cells population in cancer cells primary culture

    Opportunity of an objective evaluation of behavior of live cells freshly transferred from a tumor into in vitro primary culture has been offered by competence of Coherence Controlled Holographic Microscope (CCHM) in the make of Multimodal Holographic Microscope T1 (MHM, Tescan) for the task. CCHM Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) provides non-invasive cell mass measurements and due to coherence gate effect also in turbid media. Importance of analysis of patterns of motility/migration and growth of various cell types in mixed primary culture is currently emerging from collaboration with clinical surgeons operating on cancer. Assessment of cancer cells' behavior manifested in these conditions will contribute to individual tumor prognosis. Also appraisal of cell resistance/sensitivity to available therapeutic options should contribute to the optimization of the therapy plan. The work will consist of understanding primary cancer cell cultivation, mastering operation of CCHM while doing biological experiment and current standard valuation of cell behavior. To this basics there will be the task of adding elaboration/invention of mathematical description of cell activities comprised in the series of time-lapse images from these observations. Such method then will enable comparisons among various types of cancer cells and will lead to an innovation in the classification of the cancer cell malignancy.

    Tutor: Veselý Pavel, MUDr., CSc.

  48. Smart skin

    A PhD fellowship is available to conduct a project in the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Brno. Goal of this work is to perform theoretical study and characterize a nanostructured material which changes color based on the environment. The PhD candidate will first perform finite element modelling (FEM) to determine the physics origin of the structure behavior and fit the model on the actual structure. Then the available structures will be further studies using techniques such as near-field optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The PhD candidate will try to replicate the structure at CEITEC cleanroom or at National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, USA. This work will be primarily conducted in CEITEC. Part of the project might be also carried out in P.R. China, based on current exchange program and mutual agreement, i.e. it is NOT mandatory.

    Tutor: Neužil Pavel, doc. Ing., Dr., DSc.

  49. Stability of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings – The role of the bond coat roughness

    The work aims at deeper understanding of stability of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) as affected by the roughness of MCrAlY bond coat. Damage mechanisms and damage evolution in TBCs will be examined to identify the optimal topography of the bond coat in order to improve coating performance for components used in propulsion and power generation industries. Conventional MCrAlY + ZrO2-Y2O3 TBCs with the bond coat prepared by high-velocity oxyfuel spray and plasma spraying using feedstock powders with different size-distribution will be studied under high-temperature isothermal oxidation, thermal cycling, and room temperature mechanical loading.

    Tutor: Slámečka Karel, Ing., Ph.D.

  50. Structure and properties of resistant heater coating systems produced by means of thermal spray technologies

    The doctoral thesis is focused on research and development of complex multilayer coating heating systems composed from insulating and electrical resistance materials and produced by means of thermal spray technologies. The changes in physical and materials properties of heating systems will be also studied in detail. The aim of this work is to design of multilayer heating coating system with focus on its manufacturing utilizing powder metallurgy and thermal spray technologies processes, including the study of physical properties of each layer, its structural stability and phase transformations, which can take place within long term isothermal or cyclic thermal exposure. Conventional methods used in the field of material and physical engineering, which are available, will be used to study and evaluate in the frame of this work produced heating systems.

    Tutor: Čelko Ladislav, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  51. Supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces

    Molecular self-assembly at surfaces is a technique for preparation of nanostructures with atomic precision with future prospects for molecular electronics, heterogeneous catalysis, and molecular templates among other topics. The research within the Ph.D. study aims at the understanding of self-assembly phenomena of complex systems at metal and graphene surfaces. The later surface offers the interesting possibility to alter the self-assembly process and the functional properties of prepared nanostructures by external means, i.e., the gate voltage. (For detailed info please contact the supervisor.)

    Tutor: Čechal Jan, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  52. Synthesis and Application of Metal Ions Doped Chalcogenide Quantum Dots as Electrochemical Labels for High Selective Biomolecules Detection

    The aim of this work is the preparation of metal ions doped chalcogenide quantum dots series, which will give electrochemical signals appropriate to their given compositions. Synthesized quantum dots will be subsequently used for highly selective labels design intended for electrochemical detection of biomolecules.

    Tutor: Kopel Pavel, doc. RNDr., Ph.D.

  53. Synthesis and (bio)characterisation of nanostructured metal oxides for biomedical applications

    In Central European Institute of Technology, we have an opening for a PhD position in the area of chemistry, nanotochnologies and cell biology. The position is open and focused on candidates with the strong interdisciplinary orientation. The aim of the project will be to analyze the effect of nanostructured surfaces on osteoblast-like cell adhesion, proliferation and maturation. This project arises from the fact that the nanoscale surface topography of metals such as titanium and tantalum becomes a crucial factor to be recognized as an attractive and promising for orthopedic and dental implants osseointegration. The part of the project will be also aimed on an enhancement of antimicrobial properties of such surfaces by modification with selected nanoparticles. The student will have to manage the synthesis of nanostructured surfaces (e.g. via anodic oxidation) and surface characterization (SEM, XRD, contact angle). Afterwards, antibacterial properties of nanostructures will be tested and evaluated on several bacteria. Finally, osteoblastlike cells will be used as a model for a detail investigation of biomaterial nanotopographymediated cell responses such as adhesion, proliferation and maturation. The highly-motivated students who are interested in pursuing progress research would be encouraged to apply.

    Tutor: Fohlerová Zdenka, Mgr., Ph.D.

  54. Synthesis and modification of magnetic particles for isolation and analysis of microbial pathogens

    This work is aimed at inorganic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, its surface modification, characterization and testing in the area of an isolation of target molecules for subsequent chemical analysis. Produced particles will be chemically modified for selective isolation of nucleic acid from bacteria. The whole procedure of the isolation will be firstly tested using common laboratory approach and subsequently will be integrated in fluidic device. This device will be than tested for processing of samples of pathogenic bacterial strains.

    Tutor: Adam Vojtěch, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  55. Time and space resolved dynamics of metamagnetic nanostructures across the phase transformation

    The aim of the Ph.D. thesis is to obtain a profound understanding as well as active control of the dynamics of the phase transformation in materials featuring a first-order phase transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic states. This class of materials exhibits a metamagnetic behaviour in which the transition can be driven by several types of excitations, such as temperature, magnetic field, strain or laser pulses. The prototype material to perform this study will be the FeRh alloy. Recent studies suggest that its incorporation into meso- and nanoscale devices can result into emergent phenomena and new routes to stabilize and control the antiferromagnetic or the ferromagnetic state. The Ph.D. candidate will investigate the dynamics of the phase transition in patterned films driven by ultrafast current and laser pulses. The project will involve extending the existing scanning magnetooptical Kerr microscope to a pump-probe set-up and combining it with electrical transport measurements. Further steps will lead towards all-optical control of the magnetization in the ferromagnetic phase.

    Tutor: Spousta Jiří, prof. RNDr., Ph.D.

  56. Transport Properties of 2D Materials

    The work will be devoted to a study of transport properties of 2D materials (graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides,….) modified by various layers of adsorbants. Emphasis will be put on in situ-measurements of these properties under well defined UHV conditions and consequently to their utilization in sensing and other applications.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  57. Tuneable magnetic materials based on heterostructures featuring a first-order magnetic phase transition

    Magnetic materials constitute highly tunable material systems that have been associated with a wide range of new scientific discoveries. Coupled order parameters in complex phase-transition materials can be controlled using various driving forces such as temperature, magnetic and electric field, strain, spin-polarized currents and optical pulses. Tuning the material properties to achieve efficient transitions would enable fast and low-power electronic devices and novel functionality at nanometer length scales. The Ph.D. candidate will explore the first-order magnetic phase transition in materials that have been subjected to strong spatial confinement and design new functional systems by assembling individual structures with well controlled properties into 2D and 3D arrays forming magnetic materials with tuneable properties. The Ph.D. candidate will be involved in the deposition of materials, advanced characterization, and lithography of nanostructures. Magnetic imaging (scanning Kerr microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis, x-ray and photoemission electron microscopy), structural imaging (low energy electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction), and magnetometry will be employed to tackle the project objectives.

    Tutor: Kalousek Radek, doc. Ing., Ph.D.

  58. Utilization of electromagnetic emission for monitoring of processes in rocks

    Electromagnetic emissions (EME) arises during mechanical loading of solids. EME anomalies under natural conditions can be observed in association to tectonic loading, stress re-distribution and crack propagation prior to earthquake or in relation to gravitational mass movements. EME can be measured by various types of antennas and it is possible to perform monitoring of the above mentioned phenomena based on this measurement. The goal will be development of a methodology for measuring and processing of EME for use in predicting of earthquakes and other selected events and possibly to distinguish between different types of these phenomena. Long-term measurements of EME in caves in the Czech Republic and in the Alps in Austria will be carried out for this purpose and the results will be compared with results from other methods used in geology. Analysis of EME signals origin and propagation in studied materials and design and verification of advanced methods for measured signals processing and evaluation will be an important part of the work. The Ph.D. student will cooperate on the scientific research collaboration with the Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics of the ASCR and with Department of Geology, Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, Austria.

    Tutor: Koktavý Pavel, prof. Ing., CSc. Ph.D.

  59. Utilization of plasmonic nanostructures for local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields

    The study will be aimed at design, fabrication, and characterization of resonant plasmonic nano- and micro-structures (“diabolo” antennas, split ring resonators, etc.) providing a significant local enhancement of magnetic components of electromagnetic fields. The structures with resonant properties particularly in the IR and THz will be studied, with respect to their potential applications in relevant spectroscopic methods.

    Tutor: Šikola Tomáš, prof. RNDr., CSc.

  60. Utilization of surface science approaches in nanotechnology II

    For detailed info please contact the supervisor.

    Tutor: Varga Peter, prof. Dr., dr. h. c.


Course structure diagram with ECTS credits

Study plan wasn't generated yet for this year.