Publication detail

Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models

LEGRAND, N. LABBE, N. WEISZ-PATRAULT, D. EHRLACHER, A. LUKS, T. HORSKÝ, J.

Original Title

Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models

English Title

Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of roll bite heat transfers during pilot hot steel strip rolling. Two types of temperature sensors (drilled and slot sensors) implemented near roll surface are used with heat transfer models to identify interfacial heat flux, roll surface temperature and Heat Transfer Coefficient HTCroll-bite in the roll bite. It is shown that: - the slot type sensor is more efficient than the drilled type sensor to capture correctly fast roll temperature changes and heat fluxes in the bite during hot rolling but its life's duration is shorter. - average HTCroll-bite is within the range 15-26 kW/m^2/K: the higher the strip reduction (e.g. contact pressure) is, the higher the HTCroll-bite is. - scale thickness at strip surface tends to decrease heat transfers in the bite from strip to roll. - HTCroll-bite is not uniform along the roll-strip contact but seems proportional to contact pressure. - this non uniform HTCroll-bite along the contact could contribute to decrease thermal shock (so roll thermal fatigue) when the work roll enters the roll bite, in comparison to a uniform HTCroll-bite. - Heat transfer in the roll bite is mainly controlled by heat conduction due to the huge roll-strip temperature difference, while heat dissipated by friction at roll-strip interface seems negligible on these heat transfers.

English abstract

This paper presents an analysis of roll bite heat transfers during pilot hot steel strip rolling. Two types of temperature sensors (drilled and slot sensors) implemented near roll surface are used with heat transfer models to identify interfacial heat flux, roll surface temperature and Heat Transfer Coefficient HTCroll-bite in the roll bite. It is shown that: - the slot type sensor is more efficient than the drilled type sensor to capture correctly fast roll temperature changes and heat fluxes in the bite during hot rolling but its life's duration is shorter. - average HTCroll-bite is within the range 15-26 kW/m^2/K: the higher the strip reduction (e.g. contact pressure) is, the higher the HTCroll-bite is. - scale thickness at strip surface tends to decrease heat transfers in the bite from strip to roll. - HTCroll-bite is not uniform along the roll-strip contact but seems proportional to contact pressure. - this non uniform HTCroll-bite along the contact could contribute to decrease thermal shock (so roll thermal fatigue) when the work roll enters the roll bite, in comparison to a uniform HTCroll-bite. - Heat transfer in the roll bite is mainly controlled by heat conduction due to the huge roll-strip temperature difference, while heat dissipated by friction at roll-strip interface seems negligible on these heat transfers.

Keywords

hot strip rolling, roll bite heat transfer, inverse thermal analysis

RIV year

2012

Released

03.02.2012

Publisher

Trans Tech Publications

Location

Switzerland

Pages from

1043

Pages to

1048

Pages count

6

URL

BibTex


@article{BUT90510,
  author="Nicolas {Legrand} and Nathalie {Labbe} and Daniel {Weisz-Patrault} and Alain {Ehrlacher} and Tomáš {Luks} and Jaroslav {Horský}",
  title="Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models",
  annote="This  paper  presents  an  analysis  of  roll  bite  heat  transfers  during  pilot  hot  steel  strip 
rolling. Two types of temperature sensors (drilled and slot sensors) implemented near roll surface 
are used with heat transfer models to identify interfacial heat flux, roll surface temperature and Heat 
Transfer Coefficient HTCroll-bite in the roll bite. It is shown that: 
-  the  slot  type  sensor  is  more  efficient  than  the  drilled  type  sensor  to  capture  correctly  fast  roll 
temperature changes and heat fluxes in the bite during hot rolling but its life's duration is shorter. 
-  average  HTCroll-bite  is  within  the  range  15-26  kW/m^2/K:  the  higher  the  strip  reduction  (e.g. 
contact pressure) is, the higher the HTCroll-bite is. 
-  scale thickness at strip surface tends to decrease heat transfers in the bite from strip to roll. 
-  HTCroll-bite is not uniform along the roll-strip contact but seems proportional to contact pressure. 
-  this non uniform HTCroll-bite along the contact could contribute to decrease thermal shock (so roll 
thermal fatigue) when the work roll enters the roll bite, in comparison to a uniform HTCroll-bite. 
-  Heat transfer in the roll bite is mainly controlled by heat conduction due to the huge roll-strip 
temperature difference, while heat dissipated by friction at roll-strip interface seems negligible on 
these heat transfers.",
  address="Trans Tech Publications",
  chapter="90510",
  doi="10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.504-506.1043",
  institution="Trans Tech Publications",
  number="2",
  volume="504-506",
  year="2012",
  month="february",
  pages="1043--1048",
  publisher="Trans Tech Publications",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}