Publication detail

The Effect of Rhodamine-Derived Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticles on the Motility of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells

BAIAZITOVA, L. SKOPALÍK, J. CHMELÍK, J. ZUMBERG, I. ČMIEL, V. POLÁKOVÁ, K. PROVAZNÍK, I.

Original Title

The Effect of Rhodamine-Derived Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticles on the Motility of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells

English Title

The Effect of Rhodamine-Derived Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticles on the Motility of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells

Type

journal article

Language

en

Original Abstract

Nanoparticles have become popular in life sciences in the last few years. They have been produced in many variants and have recently been used in both biological experiments and in clinical applications. Due to concerns over nanomaterial risks, there has been a dramatic increase in investigations focused on safety research. The aim of this paper is to present the advanced testing of rhodamine-derived superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (SAMN-R), which are used for their nontoxicity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and magnetic properties. Recent results were expanded upon from the basic cytotoxic tests to evaluate cell proliferation and migration potential. Two cell types were used for the cell proliferation and tracking study: mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Advanced microscopic methods allowed for the precise quantification of the function of both cell types. This study has demonstrated that a dose of nanoparticles lower than 20 microg-cm -2 per area of the dish does not negatively affect the cells’ morphology, migration, cytoskeletal function, proliferation, potential for wound healing, and single-cell migration in comparison to standard CellTracker Green CMFDA (5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). A higher dose of nanoparticles could be a potential risk for cytoskeletal folding and detachment of the cells from the solid extracellular matrix.

English abstract

Nanoparticles have become popular in life sciences in the last few years. They have been produced in many variants and have recently been used in both biological experiments and in clinical applications. Due to concerns over nanomaterial risks, there has been a dramatic increase in investigations focused on safety research. The aim of this paper is to present the advanced testing of rhodamine-derived superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (SAMN-R), which are used for their nontoxicity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and magnetic properties. Recent results were expanded upon from the basic cytotoxic tests to evaluate cell proliferation and migration potential. Two cell types were used for the cell proliferation and tracking study: mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Advanced microscopic methods allowed for the precise quantification of the function of both cell types. This study has demonstrated that a dose of nanoparticles lower than 20 microg-cm -2 per area of the dish does not negatively affect the cells’ morphology, migration, cytoskeletal function, proliferation, potential for wound healing, and single-cell migration in comparison to standard CellTracker Green CMFDA (5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). A higher dose of nanoparticles could be a potential risk for cytoskeletal folding and detachment of the cells from the solid extracellular matrix.

Keywords

magnetic nanoparticles; mesenchymal stem cells; fibroblast cells; cytotoxicity; wound healing assay; single-cell migration

Released

27.03.2019

Publisher

MDPI

Location

Basel, Switzerland

Pages from

1192

Pages to

1209

Pages count

17

URL

Full text in the Digital Library

BibTex


@article{BUT156464,
  author="Larisa {Baiazitova} and Josef {Skopalík} and Jiří {Chmelík} and Inna {Zumberg} and Vratislav {Čmiel} and Kateřina {Poláková} and Ivo {Provazník}",
  title="The Effect of Rhodamine-Derived Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticles on the Motility of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells",
  annote="Nanoparticles have become popular in life sciences in the last few years. They have
been produced in many variants and have recently been used in both biological experiments
and in clinical applications. Due to concerns over nanomaterial risks, there has been a dramatic
increase in investigations focused on safety research. The aim of this paper is to present the
advanced testing of rhodamine-derived superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (SAMN-R),
which are used for their nontoxicity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and magnetic properties.
Recent results were expanded upon from the basic cytotoxic tests to evaluate cell proliferation and
migration potential. Two cell types were used for the cell proliferation and tracking study: mouse
embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Advanced microscopic
methods allowed for the precise quantification of the function of both cell types. This study has
demonstrated that a dose of nanoparticles lower than 20 microg-cm -2 per area of the dish does not
negatively affect the cells’ morphology, migration, cytoskeletal function, proliferation, potential for
wound healing, and single-cell migration in comparison to standard CellTracker Green CMFDA
(5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). A higher dose of nanoparticles could be a potential risk for
cytoskeletal folding and detachment of the cells from the solid extracellular matrix.",
  address="MDPI",
  chapter="156464",
  doi="10.3390/molecules24071192",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="MDPI",
  number="7",
  volume="24",
  year="2019",
  month="march",
  pages="1192--1209",
  publisher="MDPI",
  type="journal article"
}