Publication detail

Bendo-tensegrity model simulates compression test of animal cell

BANSOD, Y. JAKKA, V. BURŠA, J.

Original Title

Bendo-tensegrity model simulates compression test of animal cell

English Title

Bendo-tensegrity model simulates compression test of animal cell

Type

conference paper

Language

en

Original Abstract

A hybrid model of suspended animal cell proposed earlier, with a bendo-tensegrity structure mimicking cytoskeleton, is applied to simulate the global response of the cell under compression and to describe mechanical behaviour of its components. The Finite Element model incorporates Microtubules, Actin Filaments, Intermediate Filaments, nucleus, cytoplasm, and Cell Membrane, all of them with realistic geometrical and material parameters. The unique features of this structural model keep fundamental principles governing cell behaviour, such as interaction between the cytoskeletal components redistributing the prestress of actin filaments throughout all the structure. The force-deformation curve from the simulated compression test with microplates is validated by comparison with the experimental response from literature. The model enables us to investigate the mechanical role of individual celular and cytoskeletal components in intracellular force propagation by means of changing their numbers or parameters. As quantitative characterization of nucleus deformation may be hypothetically decisive for mechanotransduction, the model aims at better understanding of how cellular processes are mechanically controlled.

English abstract

A hybrid model of suspended animal cell proposed earlier, with a bendo-tensegrity structure mimicking cytoskeleton, is applied to simulate the global response of the cell under compression and to describe mechanical behaviour of its components. The Finite Element model incorporates Microtubules, Actin Filaments, Intermediate Filaments, nucleus, cytoplasm, and Cell Membrane, all of them with realistic geometrical and material parameters. The unique features of this structural model keep fundamental principles governing cell behaviour, such as interaction between the cytoskeletal components redistributing the prestress of actin filaments throughout all the structure. The force-deformation curve from the simulated compression test with microplates is validated by comparison with the experimental response from literature. The model enables us to investigate the mechanical role of individual celular and cytoskeletal components in intracellular force propagation by means of changing their numbers or parameters. As quantitative characterization of nucleus deformation may be hypothetically decisive for mechanotransduction, the model aims at better understanding of how cellular processes are mechanically controlled.

Keywords

cell mechanics, cytoskeleton, bendo-tensegrity model, compression test simulation

Released

14.05.2018

ISBN

978-80-86246-88-8

Book

Engineering Mechanics 2018

Pages from

45

Pages to

48

Pages count

4

URL

Documents

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT151655,
  author="Yogesh Deepak {Bansod} and Veera Venkata Satya {Jakka} and Jiří {Burša}",
  title="Bendo-tensegrity model simulates compression test of animal cell",
  annote="A hybrid model of suspended animal cell proposed earlier, with a bendo-tensegrity structure mimicking cytoskeleton, is applied to simulate the global response of the cell under compression and to describe mechanical behaviour of its components. The Finite Element model incorporates Microtubules, Actin Filaments, Intermediate Filaments, nucleus, cytoplasm, and Cell Membrane, all of them with realistic geometrical and material parameters. The unique features of this structural model keep fundamental principles governing cell behaviour, such as interaction between the cytoskeletal components redistributing the prestress of actin filaments throughout all the structure. The force-deformation curve from the simulated compression test with microplates is validated by comparison with the experimental response from literature. The model enables us to investigate the mechanical role of individual celular and cytoskeletal components in intracellular force propagation by means of changing their numbers or parameters. As quantitative characterization of nucleus deformation may be hypothetically decisive for mechanotransduction, the model aims at better understanding of how cellular processes are mechanically controlled.",
  booktitle="Engineering Mechanics 2018",
  chapter="151655",
  doi="10.21495/91-8-45",
  howpublished="print",
  year="2018",
  month="may",
  pages="45--48",
  type="conference paper"
}