Publication detail

Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila

KUČERA, D. PERNICOVÁ, I. KOVALČÍK, A. KOLLER, M. MÜLLEROVÁ, L. SEDLÁČEK, P. MRAVEC, F. NEBESAROVA, J. KALINA, M. MÁROVÁ, I. KRZYŽÁNEK, V. OBRUČA, S.

Original Title

Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila

English Title

Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

This work explores molecular, morphological as well as biotechnological features of the highly promising polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producer Halomonas halophila. Unlike many other halophiles, this bacterium does not require expensive complex media components and it is capable to accumulate high intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fractions up to 82% of cell dry mass. Most remarkably, regulating the concentration of NaCl apart from PHB yields influences also the polymer’s molecular mass and polydispersity. The bacterium metabolizes various carbohydrates including sugars predominant in lignocelluloses and other inexpensive substrates. Therefore, the bacterium was employed for PHB production on hydrolysates of cheese whey, spent coffee grounds, sawdust and corn stover, which were hydrolyzed by HCl; required salinity of cultivation media was set up during neutralization by NaOH. The bacterium was capable to use all the tested hydrolysates as well as sugar beet molasses for PHB biosynthesis, indicating its potential for industrial PHB production.

English abstract

This work explores molecular, morphological as well as biotechnological features of the highly promising polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producer Halomonas halophila. Unlike many other halophiles, this bacterium does not require expensive complex media components and it is capable to accumulate high intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fractions up to 82% of cell dry mass. Most remarkably, regulating the concentration of NaCl apart from PHB yields influences also the polymer’s molecular mass and polydispersity. The bacterium metabolizes various carbohydrates including sugars predominant in lignocelluloses and other inexpensive substrates. Therefore, the bacterium was employed for PHB production on hydrolysates of cheese whey, spent coffee grounds, sawdust and corn stover, which were hydrolyzed by HCl; required salinity of cultivation media was set up during neutralization by NaOH. The bacterium was capable to use all the tested hydrolysates as well as sugar beet molasses for PHB biosynthesis, indicating its potential for industrial PHB production.

Keywords

Halomonas halophila; Halophiles; Lignocellulose hydrolysates; Morphology of bacterial cells; Polyhydroxyalkanoates

Released

01.05.2018

Publisher

Elsevier

Pages from

552

Pages to

556

Pages count

5

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT147942,
  author="Dan {Kučera} and Iva {Pernicová} and Adriána {Kovalčík} and Lucie {Müllerová} and Petr {Sedláček} and Filip {Mravec} and Michal {Kalina} and Ivana {Márová} and Stanislav {Obruča}",
  title="Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila",
  annote="This work explores molecular, morphological as well as biotechnological features of the highly promising polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producer Halomonas halophila. Unlike many other halophiles, this bacterium does not require expensive complex media components and it is capable to accumulate high intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fractions up to 82% of cell dry mass. Most remarkably, regulating the concentration of NaCl apart from PHB yields influences also the polymer’s molecular mass and polydispersity. The bacterium metabolizes various carbohydrates including sugars predominant in lignocelluloses and other inexpensive substrates. Therefore, the bacterium was employed for PHB production on hydrolysates of cheese whey, spent coffee grounds, sawdust and corn stover, which were hydrolyzed by HCl; required salinity of cultivation media was set up during neutralization by NaOH. The bacterium was capable to use all the tested hydrolysates as well as sugar beet molasses for PHB biosynthesis, indicating its potential for industrial PHB production.",
  address="Elsevier",
  chapter="147942",
  doi="10.1016/j.biortech.2018.02.062",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="Elsevier",
  number="1",
  volume="256",
  year="2018",
  month="may",
  pages="552--556",
  publisher="Elsevier",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}