Publication detail

Determining the sub-surface damage of CdTe single crystals after lapping

ŠIK, O. ŠKVARENINA, Ľ. CAHA, O. MORAVEC, P. ŠKARVADA, P. BELAS, E. GRMELA, L.

Original Title

Determining the sub-surface damage of CdTe single crystals after lapping

English Title

Determining the sub-surface damage of CdTe single crystals after lapping

Type

journal article

Language

en

Original Abstract

We introduce an affordable and easy-to-implement method of determining the thickness of a mechanically damaged layer on the surface of a Cadmium Telluride Single crystal after mechanical lapping. This method is based on This method is based on different usage of already known defectrevealing etchants: the side projection of the lapped surface.. A comparison of developed etch pit patterns in the vicinity of the lapped side etched by the Everson solution, Nakagawa solution, Hähnert & Schenk solution, Saucedo solution, Inoue E-Ag II solution and FeCl3 is provided . The most commonly used defect-revealing etchants the Nakagawa and Everson solutions – did not show any trend of etch pit formation towards a mechanically damaged surface. On the other hand, the Saucedo, FeCl3 and E-Ag II etches were successful and achieved similar results. These etchants revealed three distinctive regions of sub-surface damage: i) A severely polycrystalline 50 μm deep damaged region with micro cracks. This region was best revealed by the FeCl3 etch. ii) A region of plastic deformations that is 180 μm deep. This region was best revealed by the E-Ag etch. iii) A region free from mechanical damage. High-Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) further confirmed the results obtained by chemical methods. Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curves decreased from the value of 1000 arcsec on the lapped surface to the value lower than 30 arcsec after the removal of 200 μm of the surface. From HRXRD analysis, the region i) can be further divided into an approx. 10 μm thin nearly amorphous region, followed by a microcrystalline region. The region ii) showed mosaic structure consisted of large crystallic blocks, with low angle misorientation from the main diffraction peak. The results showed that the thickness of the mechanically damaged layer is ten times higher than the size of the abrasive used.

English abstract

We introduce an affordable and easy-to-implement method of determining the thickness of a mechanically damaged layer on the surface of a Cadmium Telluride Single crystal after mechanical lapping. This method is based on This method is based on different usage of already known defectrevealing etchants: the side projection of the lapped surface.. A comparison of developed etch pit patterns in the vicinity of the lapped side etched by the Everson solution, Nakagawa solution, Hähnert & Schenk solution, Saucedo solution, Inoue E-Ag II solution and FeCl3 is provided . The most commonly used defect-revealing etchants the Nakagawa and Everson solutions – did not show any trend of etch pit formation towards a mechanically damaged surface. On the other hand, the Saucedo, FeCl3 and E-Ag II etches were successful and achieved similar results. These etchants revealed three distinctive regions of sub-surface damage: i) A severely polycrystalline 50 μm deep damaged region with micro cracks. This region was best revealed by the FeCl3 etch. ii) A region of plastic deformations that is 180 μm deep. This region was best revealed by the E-Ag etch. iii) A region free from mechanical damage. High-Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) further confirmed the results obtained by chemical methods. Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curves decreased from the value of 1000 arcsec on the lapped surface to the value lower than 30 arcsec after the removal of 200 μm of the surface. From HRXRD analysis, the region i) can be further divided into an approx. 10 μm thin nearly amorphous region, followed by a microcrystalline region. The region ii) showed mosaic structure consisted of large crystallic blocks, with low angle misorientation from the main diffraction peak. The results showed that the thickness of the mechanically damaged layer is ten times higher than the size of the abrasive used.

Keywords

CdTe; lapping; sub-surface damage; chemical etching; defects; mechanical damage; XRD rocking curves

Released

01.06.2018

Publisher

Springler Nature

Location

VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS

Pages from

9652

Pages to

9662

Pages count

10

URL

BibTex


@article{BUT146690,
  author="Ondřej {Šik} and Ľubomír {Škvarenina} and Ondřej {Caha} and Pavel {Moravec} and Pavel {Škarvada} and Eduard {Belas} and Lubomír {Grmela}",
  title="Determining the sub-surface damage of CdTe single crystals after lapping",
  annote="We introduce an affordable and easy-to-implement method of determining the thickness of a
mechanically damaged layer on the surface of a Cadmium Telluride Single crystal after mechanical
lapping. This method is based on This method is based on different usage of already known defectrevealing
etchants: the side projection of the lapped surface.. A comparison of developed etch pit
patterns in the vicinity of the lapped side etched by the Everson solution, Nakagawa solution, Hähnert
& Schenk solution, Saucedo solution, Inoue E-Ag II solution and FeCl3 is provided .
The most commonly used defect-revealing etchants the Nakagawa and Everson solutions – did
not show any trend of etch pit formation towards a mechanically damaged surface. On the other hand,
the Saucedo, FeCl3 and E-Ag II etches were successful and achieved similar results. These etchants
revealed three distinctive regions of sub-surface damage: i) A severely polycrystalline 50 μm deep
damaged region with micro cracks. This region was best revealed by the FeCl3 etch. ii) A region of
plastic deformations that is 180 μm deep. This region was best revealed by the E-Ag etch. iii) A region
free from mechanical damage. High-Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) further confirmed the
results obtained by chemical methods. Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curves
decreased from the value of 1000 arcsec on the lapped surface to the value lower than 30 arcsec after
the removal of 200 μm of the surface. From HRXRD analysis, the region i) can be further divided into
an approx. 10 μm thin nearly amorphous region, followed by a microcrystalline region. The region ii)
showed mosaic structure consisted of large crystallic blocks, with low angle misorientation from the
main diffraction peak. The results showed that the thickness of the mechanically damaged layer is ten
times higher than the size of the abrasive used.
",
  address="Springler Nature",
  chapter="146690",
  doi="10.1007/s10854-018-9002-7",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="Springler Nature",
  number="11",
  volume="29",
  year="2018",
  month="june",
  pages="9652--9662",
  publisher="Springler Nature",
  type="journal article"
}