Publication detail

Draft assessment in a living room with supply air convector, 7th International Symposium on Ventilation for Contaminant Control

KATOLICKÝ, J., SCHOLLER, M., JÍCHA, M.

Original Title

Draft assessment in a living room with supply air convector, 7th International Symposium on Ventilation for Contaminant Control

English Title

Draft assessment in a living room with supply air convector, 7th International Symposium on Ventilation for Contaminant Control

Type

conference paper

Language

en

Original Abstract

Within a EU funded project RESHYVENT a new hybrid ventilation system is being developed. The ventilation system is a demand controlled passive stack assisted exhaust fan system. The outdoor air enters the apartment through living room and bedrooms. The fresh air is sucked through a supply air convector and supply air radiators respectively and air leakage through the façade. The supply air convector in the living room is equipped with a heat exchanger to preheat the entering air and with a back draft damper and a wind damper. The outdoor air passes through the living room to the exhaust air terminal devices, which are located near the ceiling. In order to ensure good thermal comfort it is important that the supply air does not cause any draft. The present contribution deals with a sensitivity analysis that was performed using CFD modelling. The living room of a three bedroom apartment was chosen as a sample room. In total 63 variants have been solved, covering different air flow rates, air supply temperatures, outdoor and room temperatures. Heat transfer through the exterior walls and windows was taken into account through the proper thermal resistance. The front cover of the supply convector is made of densely perforated sheet ensuring as uniform as possible velocity profile of the outlet fresh air. There is no heat exchange between neighbouring rooms. As a results, velocity and temperature fields are obtained that show how the supply air is distributed inside the room and whether there is a draft under specific conditions, i.e. under specific combinations of supply flow rates and temperatures. Also we can conclude whether the façade leakage significantly impacts on the air distribution in the room.

English abstract

Within a EU funded project RESHYVENT a new hybrid ventilation system is being developed. The ventilation system is a demand controlled passive stack assisted exhaust fan system. The outdoor air enters the apartment through living room and bedrooms. The fresh air is sucked through a supply air convector and supply air radiators respectively and air leakage through the façade. The supply air convector in the living room is equipped with a heat exchanger to preheat the entering air and with a back draft damper and a wind damper. The outdoor air passes through the living room to the exhaust air terminal devices, which are located near the ceiling. In order to ensure good thermal comfort it is important that the supply air does not cause any draft. The present contribution deals with a sensitivity analysis that was performed using CFD modelling. The living room of a three bedroom apartment was chosen as a sample room. In total 63 variants have been solved, covering different air flow rates, air supply temperatures, outdoor and room temperatures. Heat transfer through the exterior walls and windows was taken into account through the proper thermal resistance. The front cover of the supply convector is made of densely perforated sheet ensuring as uniform as possible velocity profile of the outlet fresh air. There is no heat exchange between neighbouring rooms. As a results, velocity and temperature fields are obtained that show how the supply air is distributed inside the room and whether there is a draft under specific conditions, i.e. under specific combinations of supply flow rates and temperatures. Also we can conclude whether the façade leakage significantly impacts on the air distribution in the room.

RIV year

2004

Released

05.08.2003

Location

Sapporo

Pages from

267

Pages to

273

Pages count

7

BibTex


@inproceedings{BUT13313,
  author="Jaroslav {Katolický} and Marek {Scholler} and Miroslav {Jícha}",
  title="Draft assessment in a living room with supply air convector, 7th International Symposium on Ventilation for Contaminant Control",
  annote="Within a EU funded project RESHYVENT a new hybrid ventilation system is being developed. The ventilation system is a demand controlled passive stack assisted exhaust fan system. The outdoor air enters the apartment through living room and bedrooms. The fresh air is sucked through a supply air convector and supply air radiators respectively and air leakage through the façade. The supply air convector in the living room is equipped with a heat exchanger to preheat the entering air and with a back draft damper and a wind damper. The outdoor air passes through the living room to the exhaust air terminal devices, which are located near the ceiling.  In order to ensure good thermal comfort it is important that the supply air does not cause any draft. The present contribution deals with a sensitivity analysis that was performed using CFD modelling. The living room of a three bedroom apartment was chosen as a sample room. In total 63 variants have been solved, covering different air flow rates, air supply temperatures, outdoor and room temperatures. Heat transfer through the exterior walls and windows was taken into account through the proper thermal resistance. The front cover of the supply convector is made of densely perforated sheet ensuring as uniform as possible velocity profile of the outlet fresh air. There is no heat exchange between neighbouring rooms. As a results, velocity and temperature fields are obtained that show how the supply air is distributed inside the room and whether there is a draft under specific conditions, i.e. under specific combinations of supply flow rates and temperatures. Also we can conclude whether the façade leakage significantly impacts on the air distribution in the room.",
  booktitle="Ventilation 2003",
  chapter="13313",
  year="2003",
  month="august",
  pages="267",
  type="conference paper"
}