Publication detail

Finite element simulation of mechanical tests with bendo-tensegrity models of smooth muscle cell.

BANSOD, Y. BURŠA, J.

Original Title

Finite element simulation of mechanical tests with bendo-tensegrity models of smooth muscle cell.

English Title

Finite element simulation of mechanical tests with bendo-tensegrity models of smooth muscle cell.

Type

abstract

Language

en

Original Abstract

It is now evident that microtubules do not have compression-only behavior but appear highly curved in living cells under no external load. This indicates that the compressive forces in them are accompanied by significant bending even if loaded solely by the prestrained actin bundles; this is referred to as the “bendo-tensegrity” concept. Implementing this concept, finite element models of smooth muscle cell (SMC) are proposed considering the dominating role of flexion in behavior of microtubules. A Finite element simulation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiment with adherent cell model and tensile test with suspended cell model is performed. The numerically predicted force-displacement curves of both simulations are analogous to the non-linear experimental responses obtained with AFM and tensile test for SMC; this validates the proposed bendo-tensegrity cell models. Results show that the actin cortex plays a vital role in maintaining the cell rigidity under local deformation, whereas the microfilaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments contribute significantly to the cell response under global deformation.

English abstract

It is now evident that microtubules do not have compression-only behavior but appear highly curved in living cells under no external load. This indicates that the compressive forces in them are accompanied by significant bending even if loaded solely by the prestrained actin bundles; this is referred to as the “bendo-tensegrity” concept. Implementing this concept, finite element models of smooth muscle cell (SMC) are proposed considering the dominating role of flexion in behavior of microtubules. A Finite element simulation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiment with adherent cell model and tensile test with suspended cell model is performed. The numerically predicted force-displacement curves of both simulations are analogous to the non-linear experimental responses obtained with AFM and tensile test for SMC; this validates the proposed bendo-tensegrity cell models. Results show that the actin cortex plays a vital role in maintaining the cell rigidity under local deformation, whereas the microfilaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments contribute significantly to the cell response under global deformation.

Keywords

Cytoskeleton, Bendo-tensegrity, FInite element modelling, Cell mechanics

Released

18.05.2016

Publisher

XXIV Cytoskeletal Club, Veterinary Research Institute, Masaryk University.

Location

Vranovska Ves, Czech Republic.

Documents

BibTex


@misc{BUT129891,
  author="Yogesh Deepak {Bansod} and Jiří {Burša}",
  title="Finite element simulation of mechanical tests with bendo-tensegrity models of smooth muscle cell.",
  annote="It is now evident that microtubules do not have compression-only behavior but appear highly curved in
living cells under no external load. This indicates that the compressive forces in them are accompanied by
significant bending even if loaded solely by the prestrained actin bundles; this is referred to as the
“bendo-tensegrity” concept. Implementing this concept, finite element models of smooth muscle cell
(SMC) are proposed considering the dominating role of flexion in behavior of microtubules. A Finite
element simulation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiment with adherent cell model and tensile
test with suspended cell model is performed. The numerically predicted force-displacement curves of both
simulations are analogous to the non-linear experimental responses obtained with AFM and tensile test
for SMC; this validates the proposed bendo-tensegrity cell models. Results show that the actin cortex
plays a vital role in maintaining the cell rigidity under local deformation, whereas the microfilaments,
microtubules and intermediate filaments contribute significantly to the cell response under global
deformation.",
  address="XXIV Cytoskeletal Club, Veterinary Research Institute, Masaryk University.",
  chapter="129891",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="XXIV Cytoskeletal Club, Veterinary Research Institute, Masaryk University.",
  year="2016",
  month="may",
  publisher="XXIV Cytoskeletal Club, Veterinary Research Institute, Masaryk University.",
  type="abstract"
}