Publication detail

Novel vibrational and solar energy harvesters

FIALA, P.

Original Title

Novel vibrational and solar energy harvesters

English Title

Novel vibrational and solar energy harvesters

Type

journal article - other

Language

en

Original Abstract

Electrical energy currently comes primarily from fossil fuel combustion and nuclear fission. These energy sources are neither renewable nor suited to small-scale devices. Most important, electrical generators typically do not make use of all energy output, e.g., IR light in the case of solar cells. Energy harvesting aims to address these limitations by making use of background (unused) energy. While the original concept of employing unused energy dates back centuries, vibrational and solar energy harvesting are largely emerging technologies. For example, kinetic energy harvesters employ vibrational energy commonly electrostatic, electromagnetic, or piezoelectric (the translation of mechanical stress into electricity) to power small devices, such as a vibrational sensor to control grip forces exerted by a prosthetic hand1 and a small-scale wind power generator.

English abstract

Electrical energy currently comes primarily from fossil fuel combustion and nuclear fission. These energy sources are neither renewable nor suited to small-scale devices. Most important, electrical generators typically do not make use of all energy output, e.g., IR light in the case of solar cells. Energy harvesting aims to address these limitations by making use of background (unused) energy. While the original concept of employing unused energy dates back centuries, vibrational and solar energy harvesting are largely emerging technologies. For example, kinetic energy harvesters employ vibrational energy commonly electrostatic, electromagnetic, or piezoelectric (the translation of mechanical stress into electricity) to power small devices, such as a vibrational sensor to control grip forces exerted by a prosthetic hand1 and a small-scale wind power generator.

Keywords

Solar energy, energy harvesting, nanostructures

RIV year

2011

Released

22.06.2011

Publisher

SPIE

Pages from

1

Pages to

3

Pages count

3

BibTex


@article{BUT72535,
  author="Pavel {Fiala}",
  title="Novel vibrational and solar energy harvesters",
  annote="Electrical energy currently comes primarily from fossil fuel combustion and nuclear fission. These energy sources are neither renewable nor suited to small-scale devices. Most important, electrical generators typically do not make use of all energy output, e.g., IR light in the case of solar cells. Energy harvesting aims to address these limitations by making use of background (unused) energy. While the original concept of employing unused energy dates back centuries, vibrational and solar energy harvesting are largely emerging technologies. For example, kinetic energy harvesters employ vibrational energy commonly electrostatic, electromagnetic, or piezoelectric (the translation of mechanical stress into electricity) to power small devices, such as a vibrational sensor to control grip forces exerted by a prosthetic hand1 and a small-scale wind power generator.",
  address="SPIE",
  chapter="72535",
  institution="SPIE",
  journal="SPIE Professional Magazine",
  number="1",
  volume="2011",
  year="2011",
  month="june",
  pages="1--3",
  publisher="SPIE",
  type="journal article - other"
}