Publication detail

Soil protein as a potential antimicrobial agent against methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus

ANANBEH, H. MERLOS RODRIGO, M. JELÍNKOVÁ, P. STRMISKA, V. ŠPLÍCHAL, Z. MICHÁLKOVÁ, H. STOJANOVIC, M. VOBĚRKOVÁ, S. ADAM, V. MOULICK, A.

Original Title

Soil protein as a potential antimicrobial agent against methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus

English Title

Soil protein as a potential antimicrobial agent against methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

Recently, the interest is increasing to find alternatives to replace the usage of antibiotics since their massive and improper usage enhance the antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. In this study, for the first time we showed that the soil proteins have very high antibacterial activity (98% of growth inhibition) against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most threatening human pathogens. We found that the protein extract (C3) from the forest with past intensive management showed higher antibacterial activity than that of unmanaged forest. The MIC and IC50 were found to be 30 and 15.0 mu g protein g(-1) dry soil respectively. C3 was found to kill the bacteria by cell wall disruption and genotoxicity which was confirmed by optical and fluorescent microscopy and comet assay. According to qPCR study, the mecA (the antibiotic resistant gene) expression in MRSA was found to be down-regulated after C3 treatment. In contrast, C3 showed no hemolytic toxicity on human red blood cells which was confirmed by hemolytic assay. According to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), 144 proteins were identified in C3 among which the majority belonged to Gram negative bacteria (45.8%). Altogether, our results will help to develop novel, costeffective, non-toxic and highly efficient antibacterial medicines from natural sources against antibiotic resistant infections.

English abstract

Recently, the interest is increasing to find alternatives to replace the usage of antibiotics since their massive and improper usage enhance the antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. In this study, for the first time we showed that the soil proteins have very high antibacterial activity (98% of growth inhibition) against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most threatening human pathogens. We found that the protein extract (C3) from the forest with past intensive management showed higher antibacterial activity than that of unmanaged forest. The MIC and IC50 were found to be 30 and 15.0 mu g protein g(-1) dry soil respectively. C3 was found to kill the bacteria by cell wall disruption and genotoxicity which was confirmed by optical and fluorescent microscopy and comet assay. According to qPCR study, the mecA (the antibiotic resistant gene) expression in MRSA was found to be down-regulated after C3 treatment. In contrast, C3 showed no hemolytic toxicity on human red blood cells which was confirmed by hemolytic assay. According to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), 144 proteins were identified in C3 among which the majority belonged to Gram negative bacteria (45.8%). Altogether, our results will help to develop novel, costeffective, non-toxic and highly efficient antibacterial medicines from natural sources against antibiotic resistant infections.

Keywords

Soil protein; Forest soil; MRSA; Natural products; Antibacterial

Released

16.09.2020

Pages from

1

Pages to

13

Pages count

13

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT165242,
  author="Hanadi Abd Al Rahman Ali {Ananbeh} and Miguel Ángel {Merlos Rodrigo} and Pavlína {Jelínková} and Vladislav {Strmiska} and Zbyněk {Šplíchal} and Hana {Michálková} and Marko {Stojanovic} and Stanislava {Voběrková} and Vojtěch {Adam} and Amitava {Moulick}",
  title="Soil protein as a potential antimicrobial agent against methicillin – resistant Staphylococcus aureus",
  annote="Recently, the interest is increasing to find alternatives to replace the usage of antibiotics since their massive and improper usage enhance the antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. In this study, for the first time we showed that the soil proteins have very high antibacterial activity (98% of growth inhibition) against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most threatening human pathogens. We found that the protein extract (C3) from the forest with past intensive management showed higher antibacterial activity than that of unmanaged forest. The MIC and IC50 were found to be 30 and 15.0 mu g protein g(-1) dry soil respectively. C3 was found to kill the bacteria by cell wall disruption and genotoxicity which was confirmed by optical and fluorescent microscopy and comet assay. According to qPCR study, the mecA (the antibiotic resistant gene) expression in MRSA was found to be down-regulated after C3 treatment. In contrast, C3 showed no hemolytic toxicity on human red blood cells which was confirmed by hemolytic assay. According to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS), 144 proteins were identified in C3 among which the majority belonged to Gram negative bacteria (45.8%). Altogether, our results will help to develop novel, costeffective, non-toxic and highly efficient antibacterial medicines from natural sources against antibiotic resistant infections.",
  chapter="165242",
  doi="10.1016/j.envres.2020.109320",
  howpublished="print",
  number="109320",
  volume="188",
  year="2020",
  month="september",
  pages="1--13",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}