Publication detail

Evaluation of Material Systems for THz Quantum Cascade Laser Active Regions

DETZ, H. ANDREWS, A. KAINZ, M. SCHÖNHUBER, S. ZEDERBAUER, T. MACFARLAND, D. KRALL, M. DEUTSCH, C. BRANDSTETTER, M. KLANG, P. SCHRENK, W. UNTERRAINER, K. STRASSER, G.

Original Title

Evaluation of Material Systems for THz Quantum Cascade Laser Active Regions

English Title

Evaluation of Material Systems for THz Quantum Cascade Laser Active Regions

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been realized in several different material systems. In the mid-infrared, active regions are predominantly based on In0.53Ga0.47As and InAs as quantumwellmaterial. Market-ready devices routinely provide continuous-wave operation at room temperature. For their THz counterparts, the situation is less clear. The most common material system for THz QCLs is the inherently lattice-matched combination of GaAs with Al0.15Ga0.85As barriers. Yet, these devices still only reach a maximum operating temperature of 200 K with a lack of progress within the past years. Based on the identification of key parameters, this work reviews material systems for quantum cascade lasers with an emphasis on material and growth-related aspects and the goal to identify promising candidates for future device generations. Similar active regions realized in different material systems allow to estimate the gain per unit thickness, as well as total growth times and relative thickness errors.

English abstract

Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been realized in several different material systems. In the mid-infrared, active regions are predominantly based on In0.53Ga0.47As and InAs as quantumwellmaterial. Market-ready devices routinely provide continuous-wave operation at room temperature. For their THz counterparts, the situation is less clear. The most common material system for THz QCLs is the inherently lattice-matched combination of GaAs with Al0.15Ga0.85As barriers. Yet, these devices still only reach a maximum operating temperature of 200 K with a lack of progress within the past years. Based on the identification of key parameters, this work reviews material systems for quantum cascade lasers with an emphasis on material and growth-related aspects and the goal to identify promising candidates for future device generations. Similar active regions realized in different material systems allow to estimate the gain per unit thickness, as well as total growth times and relative thickness errors.

Keywords

III–V heterostructures, intersubband devices, molecular beam epitaxy, quantum cascade lasers, superlattices

Released

26.09.2018

Pages from

1

Pages to

8

Pages count

8

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT150301,
  author="Hermann {Detz} and Aaron M. {Andrews} and Martin A. {Kainz} and Sebastian {Schönhuber} and Tobias {Zederbauer} and Donald {MacFarland} and Michael {Krall} and Christoph {Deutsch} and Martin {Brandstetter} and Pavel {Klang} and Werner {Schrenk} and Karl {Unterrainer} and Gottfried {Strasser}",
  title="Evaluation of Material Systems for THz Quantum Cascade Laser Active Regions",
  annote="Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been realized in several different material
systems. In the mid-infrared, active regions are predominantly based on
In0.53Ga0.47As and InAs as quantumwellmaterial. Market-ready devices routinely
provide continuous-wave operation at room temperature. For their THz counterparts,
the situation is less clear. The most common material system for THz
QCLs is the inherently lattice-matched combination of GaAs with Al0.15Ga0.85As
barriers. Yet, these devices still only reach a maximum operating temperature of
200 K with a lack of progress within the past years. Based on the identification of
key parameters, this work reviews material systems for quantum cascade lasers
with an emphasis on material and growth-related aspects and the goal to identify
promising candidates for future device generations. Similar active regions realized
in different material systems allow to estimate the gain per unit thickness, as well
as total growth times and relative thickness errors.",
  chapter="150301",
  doi="10.1002/pssa.201800504",
  howpublished="print",
  number="1",
  volume="1",
  year="2018",
  month="september",
  pages="1--8",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}