Publication detail

Using a Design of Experiment for a Comprehensive Analysis of the Surface Quality and Cutting Speed in WED-Machined Hadfield Steel

MOURALOVÁ, K. BENEŠ, L. BEDNÁŘ, J. ZAHRADNÍČEK, R. PROKEŠ, T. MATOUŠEK, R. HRABEC, P. FIŠEROVÁ, Z. OTOUPALÍK, J.

Original Title

Using a Design of Experiment for a Comprehensive Analysis of the Surface Quality and Cutting Speed in WED-Machined Hadfield Steel

English Title

Using a Design of Experiment for a Comprehensive Analysis of the Surface Quality and Cutting Speed in WED-Machined Hadfield Steel

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

Wire Electrical Discharge Machining (WEDM) is an unconventional machining method used to manufacture complex-shaped, precise components. Considering the high-energy intensity of the wire erosion process, its effective implementation requires a maximum cutting speed while still ensuring the best possible quality of the machined surface. For this latter purpose, we conducted a design of experiment (DoE) comprising 33 cycles and five input factors, or machine setting parameters: gap voltage, pulse on time, pulse off time, discharge current, and wire feed. In this context, the present paper statistically evaluates the cutting speed in Hadfield steel, as related to machine setting parameters, and it also analyzes the machined surfaces of the applied samples. The actual experiment involved examining in detail the topography of the surfaces, using one contact and three non-contact profilers. The surface morphologies were observed via electron microscopy, and a lamella was prepared to facilitate the chemical composition analysis (EDX) with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). To study the subsurface layer and its defects, we produced metallographic specimens of all the samples; the observation of the items was performed by means of light and electron microscopes. With a maximum cutting speed the highest quality of the machined surface was achieved; however, the burned cavities can affect the life expectancy of the machined parts. The TEM lamella revealed that the individual alloying elements had segregated into regions, exhibiting high volumes of both manganese and the recast layer and, due to the use of WEDM, a manganese separation layer had formed at the boundary of the recast layer and the base material.

English abstract

Wire Electrical Discharge Machining (WEDM) is an unconventional machining method used to manufacture complex-shaped, precise components. Considering the high-energy intensity of the wire erosion process, its effective implementation requires a maximum cutting speed while still ensuring the best possible quality of the machined surface. For this latter purpose, we conducted a design of experiment (DoE) comprising 33 cycles and five input factors, or machine setting parameters: gap voltage, pulse on time, pulse off time, discharge current, and wire feed. In this context, the present paper statistically evaluates the cutting speed in Hadfield steel, as related to machine setting parameters, and it also analyzes the machined surfaces of the applied samples. The actual experiment involved examining in detail the topography of the surfaces, using one contact and three non-contact profilers. The surface morphologies were observed via electron microscopy, and a lamella was prepared to facilitate the chemical composition analysis (EDX) with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). To study the subsurface layer and its defects, we produced metallographic specimens of all the samples; the observation of the items was performed by means of light and electron microscopes. With a maximum cutting speed the highest quality of the machined surface was achieved; however, the burned cavities can affect the life expectancy of the machined parts. The TEM lamella revealed that the individual alloying elements had segregated into regions, exhibiting high volumes of both manganese and the recast layer and, due to the use of WEDM, a manganese separation layer had formed at the boundary of the recast layer and the base material.

Keywords

WEDM; electrical discharge machining; Hadfield steel; morphology; topography; TEM lamella; design of experiment

Released

30.04.2019

Publisher

Springer

Location

Korejská republika

Pages from

2371

Pages to

2386

Pages count

16

URL

BibTex


@article{BUT149930,
  author="Kateřina {Mouralová} and Libor {Beneš} and Josef {Bednář} and Radim {Zahradníček} and Tomáš {Prokeš} and Radomil {Matoušek} and Pavel {Hrabec} and Zuzana {Fišerová} and Jan {Otoupalík}",
  title="Using a Design of Experiment for a Comprehensive Analysis of the Surface Quality and Cutting Speed in WED-Machined Hadfield Steel",
  annote="Wire Electrical Discharge Machining (WEDM) is an unconventional machining method used to manufacture complex-shaped, precise components. Considering the high-energy intensity of the wire erosion process, its effective implementation requires a maximum cutting speed while still ensuring the best possible quality of the machined surface. For this latter purpose, we conducted a design of experiment (DoE) comprising 33 cycles and five input factors, or machine setting parameters: gap voltage, pulse on time, pulse off time, discharge current, and wire feed. In this context, the present paper statistically evaluates the cutting speed in Hadfield steel, as related to machine setting parameters, and it also analyzes the machined surfaces of the applied samples. The actual experiment involved examining in detail the topography of the surfaces, using one contact and three non-contact profilers. The surface morphologies were observed via electron microscopy, and a lamella was prepared to facilitate the chemical composition analysis (EDX) with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). To study the subsurface layer and its defects, we produced metallographic specimens of all the samples; the observation of the items was performed by means of light and electron microscopes. With a maximum cutting speed the highest quality of the machined surface was achieved; however, the burned cavities can affect the life expectancy of the machined parts. The TEM lamella revealed that the individual alloying elements had segregated into regions, exhibiting high volumes of both manganese and the recast layer and, due to the use of WEDM, a manganese separation layer had formed at the boundary of the recast layer and the base material.",
  address="Springer",
  chapter="149930",
  doi="10.1007/s12206-019-0437-4",
  institution="Springer",
  number="5",
  volume="33",
  year="2019",
  month="april",
  pages="2371--2386",
  publisher="Springer",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}