Publication detail

Effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on motor speech disorder in Parkinson’s disease

BRABENEC, L. MEKYSKA, J. GALÁŽ, Z. KLOBUŠIAKOVÁ, P. KOŠŤÁLOVÁ, M. REKTOROVÁ, I.

Original Title

Effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on motor speech disorder in Parkinson’s disease

English Title

Effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on motor speech disorder in Parkinson’s disease

Type

abstract

Language

en

Original Abstract

Introduction Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) which does not respond well to PD treatments. We investigated short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on HD in PD using acoustic analysis of speech. Methods We used both high and low frequency rTMS applied over the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left orofacial primary motor area, and over the vertex (a control stimulation site) in 15 PD patients using a cross-over design. Resting state seed-based functional connectivity (rs-FC) with the seed located in the stimulation site was used to unravel the neural underpinnings of rTMS-induced behavioural changes. Results Both 1 Hz and 10 Hz rTMS of the right STG induced some positive changes on HD. The major impact was observed for 1 Hz rTMS over the STG. The stimulation improved speech articulation and rhythmicity via modulation of the STG rs-FC with the parahippocampal gyrus and cerebellum. The 10 Hz rTMS of the STG improved articulation while enhancing the rs-FC with the inferior parietal lobule and thalamus.

English abstract

Introduction Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) which does not respond well to PD treatments. We investigated short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on HD in PD using acoustic analysis of speech. Methods We used both high and low frequency rTMS applied over the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left orofacial primary motor area, and over the vertex (a control stimulation site) in 15 PD patients using a cross-over design. Resting state seed-based functional connectivity (rs-FC) with the seed located in the stimulation site was used to unravel the neural underpinnings of rTMS-induced behavioural changes. Results Both 1 Hz and 10 Hz rTMS of the right STG induced some positive changes on HD. The major impact was observed for 1 Hz rTMS over the STG. The stimulation improved speech articulation and rhythmicity via modulation of the STG rs-FC with the parahippocampal gyrus and cerebellum. The 10 Hz rTMS of the STG improved articulation while enhancing the rs-FC with the inferior parietal lobule and thalamus.

Keywords

Parkinson's disease; hypokinetic dysarthria; repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

Released

02.04.2018

Pages from

e9

Pages count

1

URL

BibTex


@misc{BUT148626,
  author="Luboš {Brabenec} and Jiří {Mekyska} and Zoltán {Galáž} and Patrícia {Klobušiaková} and Milena {Košťálová} and Irena {Rektorová}",
  title="Effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on motor speech disorder in Parkinson’s disease",
  annote="Introduction
Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) which does not respond well to PD treatments. We investigated short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on HD in PD using acoustic analysis of speech.

Methods
We used both high and low frequency rTMS applied over the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left orofacial primary motor area, and over the vertex (a control stimulation site) in 15 PD patients using a cross-over design. Resting state seed-based functional connectivity (rs-FC) with the seed located in the stimulation site was used to unravel the neural underpinnings of rTMS-induced behavioural changes.

Results
Both 1 Hz and 10 Hz rTMS of the right STG induced some positive changes on HD. The major impact was observed for 1 Hz rTMS over the STG. The stimulation improved speech articulation and rhythmicity via modulation of the STG rs-FC with the parahippocampal gyrus and cerebellum. The 10 Hz rTMS of the STG improved articulation while enhancing the rs-FC with the inferior parietal lobule and thalamus.",
  chapter="148626",
  doi="10.1016/j.clinph.2018.01.030",
  howpublished="print",
  number="4",
  year="2018",
  month="april",
  pages="e9",
  type="abstract"
}